Stephane Mahe/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Trump's out: A White House official confirms to Politico that President Trump plans to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement, the most comprehensive international climate pact ever negotiated. The move is certain to draw the ire of dozens of American allies, but has support from White House hardliners and major oil companies. Politico reports:

It will take years for the U.S. to formally withdraw from the Paris deal. But the U.S. is the world’s second-largest carbon polluter, and its decision to walk away threatens to weaken the resolve of major emitters such as China and India to keep their own pledges, even though both nations have pledged to remain in the agreement.

Parting ways: Uber has fired Anthony Levandowski, the star engineer at the center of the company’s legal blowup over alleged theft of trade secrets from Waymo, Google’s self-driving car unit. (The New York Times)

• See also: New York Magazine takes an in-depth look at Uber’s recent “existential crisis,” questioning whether the ride-sharing giant is fatally doomed or simply going through a rough patch.

Portland’s battlefield: In recent months, the Pacific Northwest city usually touted for its progressive politics and history of civil protest has turned into a stage for high-profile clashes between far-right and far-left demonstrators, expressed most dramatically through the fatal stabbings this weekend. (Washington Post)

Poverty’s mindset: Following HUD Secretary Ben Carson’s recent controversial comments that poverty is a “state of mind,” The New York Times talks with experts on the known cause-and-effects of poverty and mental functioning.

Intentional segregation: Smithsonian Magazine talks with an economics researcher about his new book on how the federal government’s history of racially segregating American cities—by design.

The death of “old Seattle”: The pending sale of a grunge landmark has some declaring the city dead, compounded by the “money urbanism” of Amazon–which hit $1,000 a share yesterday. (Seattle Times, The Stranger)

Parking reform: A Los Angeles Times column calls for overhauling the city’s failed policies, which have created 200 square miles of parking spaces and jacked up housing prices, while drivers still compete for scarce spots.

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