A Waymo driverless car
AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Look out, Uber: A new deal between Waymo, Google’s self-driving car unit, and the ride-hailing company Lyft aims to advance driverless car tech through pilot projects and product development. The pairing poses a competitive threat to Uber, The New York Times writes:

Lyft is a distant No. 2 to Uber among ride-hailing services in the United States, and the two companies are bitter rivals. Waymo is also competing fiercely with Uber in the creation of technology for autonomous cars and is embroiled in a lawsuit over what it says is Uber’s use of stolen Waymo trade secrets to develop such technology.

Housing coup: Baltimore’s mayor has backed advocates’ calls to issue $40 million in bonds per year for affordable housing and deconstruction of vacant homes. (Baltimore Sun)

Reviving the mall: As the U.S. continues to write eulogies for its malls, Hong Kong may offer a global model for success—locating malls above subway stations and within high-profile skyscrapers. (Business Standard)

The next Robert Moses?: The innovative ideas of Elon Musk can’t help but remind some people of New York City planner Robert Moses in their potential to perpetuate racial and class inequalities. (Greater Greater Washington)

Growing up: As more cities look for ways to grow food closer to home, the idea of high-tech “vertical farms” has advanced beyond the experimental phase despite challenges of high costs and regulatory burdens. (The Wall Street Journal)

Get the lead out: Several groups are warning that any weakening of the EPA’s lead poisoning regulations would be disastrous for polluted, poverty-stricken communities with older housing stocks (see: East Chicago). (NWI Times)

Another round?: A new listing by Deutsche Bank shows how much it costs to buy a beer in cities around the world. We wouldn’t mind picking up the tab in Prague or Johannesburg, but a brew in Oslo or Singapore will cost a pretty penny. In the U.S., New York and Boston are most expensive. (Business Insider, Boston.com)

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