Apple CEO Tim Cook is pictured
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A morning roundup of the day’s news.

It’s official: Apple CEO Tim Cook has confirmed what most already knew—the company has entered the self-driving car wars, apparently concentrating on technology development. The Washington Post reports:

“Apple appears to be taking the same route as Waymo/Google, which is to focus on the technology of self-driving cars while leaving vehicle production to established automakers,” said Karl Brauer, an analyst at Kelley Blue Book. “This puts Apple and Google in direct competition, again. Are we looking at a future with two major autonomous vehicle systems just as we currently have two major smartphone systems? The answer seems to be ‘yes.’ ”

Opioids and HIV: On Capitol Hill today, public health experts are examining the relationship between the opioid epidemic and rising HIV rates, including new efforts to map out data on the most vulnerable U.S. counties. (The Washington Post)

Who knows best? More than two dozen applications have been submitted to be the team that oversees civil rights reforms at the Baltimore Police Department, leaving the city with a choice: does it want locals who know the community, or experts with experience across the nation? (Baltimore Sun)

Common solutions: The idea behind Philadelphia’s “Reimagining the Civic Commons” movement is that boundaries of race and class break down when people share public gathering places like parks, trails, and libraries. Now the initiative is spreading to other cities. (Yes Magazine)

Bikes vs. cars 2035: With bikes posing one of the biggest logistical challenges for emerging driverless car technology, The Guardian imagines how the two transport modes will interact in the future, including the potential for segregated roads.

The urban lens:

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