Travis Kalanick is pictured.
Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

The ride ends here: After months of turmoil for Uber, CEO Travis Kalanick has resigned from the ride-hailing company he founded in 2009 at the demand of five major investors. He will stay on the company’s board. The New York Times reports:

The move caps months of questions over the leadership of Uber, which has become a prime example of Silicon Valley start-up culture gone awry. The company has been exposed this year as having a workplace culture that included sexual harassment and discrimination, and it has pushed the envelope in dealing with law enforcement and even partners. That tone was set by Mr. Kalanick, who has aggressively turned the company into the world’s dominant ride-hailing service and upended the transportation industry around the globe.

  • The big news came shortly after Uber announced that it’s adding a tipping feature for drivers, starting in three cities, as part of its new “180 Days of Change” campaign. (TechCrunch)

Fighting crime: Attorney General Jeff Sessions has announced a new strategy to provide intensive Justice Department assistance to combat violent crime in 12 cities, including Baton Rouge, Cincinnati, Buffalo, and Kansas City. Notably absent from the list: Baltimore and Chicago. (Washington Post)

The High Line’s next act: The director of the iconic New York City park has launched a new collaboration: The High Line Network, joining 19 leaders of varied adaptive reuse projects across the U.S. to learn from each other’s successes and mistakes. (Fast Co.Design)

  • CityLab looked into the network in February, asking if the High Line founders can help other cities learn from their mistakes.

Conflict of interest? President Trump’s proposed 15 percent budget cut for HUD leaves intact a federal housing subsidy for private landlords—affecting Trump himself, as part-owner of the Starrett City in Brooklyn, the nation’s largest subsidized housing complex. (Washington Post)

London vs. cars: London Mayor Sadiq Khan has set a goal of reducing 3 million car journeys per day in the capital, through strategies like pay-per-mile road pricing and banning car parking in new developments. (Guardian)

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