Jared Kushner is pictured.
Jim Bourg/Reuters

A morning round-up of the day’s news.

Jersey City fallout: Jared Kushner was once a key player in the luxurification of Jersey City. Now that he’s a senior aide to President Donald Trump, however, the city has turned on the former developer, withdrawing support for high-profile projects and spotlighting his family company’s business practices. The L.A. Times reports:

“The Kushners are woven into the fabric of a lot of communities in New Jersey, but the problem for them is that none of those communities like Trump,” said Matt Hale, a political scientist at Seton Hall University in Newark. If you anger someone in New Jersey, he added, “You don’t get the tax abatement. That’s the transactional nature of New Jersey politics.”

Catalyzing neighborhoods:  In Chicago, a new “community catalyst fund,” backed by $100 million from the city, will enlist the private sector to help provide affordable loans in low-income areas to jump-start business and real estate. (Chicago Times)

Citizenship momentum: A July Fourth op-ed from Next City highlights the Cities for Citizenship program—now involving 40 U.S. cities, nearly 20 of which joined up in the past year—as one effort local governments are taking to help support immigrants.

Dead on the tracks: A Chinese inventor’s much-hyped plan for a “traffic-straddling” giant tram is now effectively killed, following the arrest of 32 people from an investment company that backed the project. (New York Times)

Sober home scandals: In the backyard of Trump’s Mar-a-Lago, Palm Beach County is host to one of the country’s most troubling heroin epidemics, fueled in recent years by the growth of corrupt “sober homes” that thrive off insurance fraud and covert drug distribution. (Politico Magazine)

The urban lens:

There aren't many alleys left in Atlanta, but if you look hard enough, you'll find 'em.

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