Demonstrators gather for a protest calling for a $15-an-hour nationwide minimum wage in Chicago. Jim Young/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Wage wars: In the battle between state legislatures and city halls over minimum wage laws, states are decidedly winning. So far 27 states have passed laws requiring cities to abide by statewide minimums, thwarting local efforts to raise wages. NPR reports:

The latest example of this is in Missouri, where a state law will take effect next month, rolling back St. Louis' $10-an-hour minimum wage ordinance passed earlier this year. That means thousands of minimum-wage earners in the city could go back to earning the state rate of $7.70 an hour.

Driver-free shuttle hits U.S.: French automaker NAVYA has confirmed plans to create its first assembly plant in North America for driverless shuttles outside Ann Arbor. The firm’s shuttles can carry up to 15 people at a top speed of 28 miles per hour. (Crain’s Detroit)

ICE-ing sanctuaries: In an interview yesterday, Donald Trump’s director of Immigrations and Customs Enforcement vowed to funnel more resources and manpower to cracking down on “ludicrous” sanctuary cities, warning: “ICE is open for business.” (The Hill)

River vision: A design firm has unveiled new ideas for connecting the Mississippi riverfront to downtown Memphis, including adventure parks, an open-air market, and a civil rights history loop. (Memphis Biz Chronicle)

The Death with Dignity movement: Washington, D.C.’s “right to die” law took effect Monday, adding the city to six states including Colorado and California that have allowed the practice of physician-assisted suicide. For a helpful primer on the movement, see this Washington Post video.

Mapping the hipsters: A new crowd-sourced mapping platform from Hoodmaps color-codes different areas of cities worldwide based on their demographics: hipsters, suits, normies, rich, uni, and tourists.

Drinking while shopping: More developers are pushing cities to relax open-containers laws to help create buzz for outdoor shopping districts—and fight the threat of e-commerce. (Atlanta Biz Chronicle, Wall Street Journal for subscribers)

Following development along England’s heritage railway:


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