Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer speaks speaks at a news conference as Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe, center, and Virginia Secretary of Public safety Brian Moran, left, listen. Steve Helber/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

After Charlottesville: Following the violence in the Virginia college town Saturday from a white supremacy rally, vigils and rallies of solidarity took place across the country in cities from Los Angeles to Pittsburgh. Meanwhile, The Washington Post tracks Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer’s rise as a vocal critic of President Donald Trump:

For Signer, Trump’s repeated failure to “condone, denounce, silence, put to bed” the white supremacist voices that invoked his name during the campaign and after he won the White House is why Charlottesville was besieged with violence on Saturday. The president’s statement after the violence, which fell short of directly calling out extremist groups—even after a car allegedly driven by a Nazi sympathizer plowed into counterprotesters—is another example of that, Signer said.

“When you dance with the devil, the devil changes you,” the mayor said on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” quoting an old saying.

  • See also: Despite witnessing the controversy spurred by removal of Confederate symbols in Charlottesville, the mayor of Lexington, Kentucky is moving forward with plans to move Confederate monuments from a city courthouse that’s undergoing a $30 million renovation. (Washington Post)

When higher salaries don’t matter: Low-skilled workers are avoiding and moving out of cities like Boston, New York, and San Francisco, according to a new report which shows that high housing costs negate the higher salaries that come in these prosperous cities. (Quartz)

Rise of the gondola: Cities across the country are exploring gondolas as a commuting alternative—including three proposals now in New York state—but the projects face skepticism from both elected officials and the riding public. (New York Times)

Cashing in on pot: As relaxed recreational marijuana laws hit California, several small, financially strapped cities in southeast Los Angeles County and elsewhere are seizing new business opportunities—despite resistance from some residents. (Los Angeles Times)

What happened to Japantown?: Though thousands of Japanese-Americans were resettled in Chicago from World War II incarceration camps, the government pressure to assimilate into white society made the city’s unofficial “Japantown” a short-lived affair. (WBEZ)

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