Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel speaks with media in December 2016. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

On offense: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that his city will sue the Justice Department over requirements placed on crime-fighting funds that would force cities to comply with federal immigration policies. The Chicago Sun-Times reports:

Emanuel said Trump and Sessions are using [the stipulations] to “coerce” the city into choosing between its values and effective policing. He said immigration and policing strategy are unrelated.

“Chicago will not be blackmailed into changing our values, and we are and will remain a welcoming city,” Emanuel said.

Subway rescue plan: To fund improvements for the beleaguered New York City subway and reduce fares for low-income riders, Mayor Bill de Blasio is pushing for a so-called “millionaire’s tax”— asking “the wealthiest in our city to chip in a little extra to help move our transit system into the 21st century,” the mayor said. (New York Times)

The Green Rush: One of the nation’s largest marijuana companies has purchased the old Gold Rush town of Nipton, California, with the goal of turning it into an “energy-independent, cannabis-friendly hospitality destination.” (AP)

Carson in Illinois: HUD boss Ben Carson is in East Chicago today to learn about residents displaced by lead and arsenic contamination within a federal “Superfund” site; then he heads to Cairo, Illinois, to explore options for 200 residents his agency plans to relocate from deteriorating public housing. (NWI Times, The Southern Illinoisan)

Undercover mayor: Before Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams made the controversial site selection for a new homeless center, he secretly spent a night in a men’s shelter the plan would shut down. What he saw: violence, drugs, and a need to act. (Deseret News)

The urban lens:

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