A statue depicting a Confederate soldier in Piedmont Park in Atlanta is vandalized with spray paint Monday, Aug. 14, 2017. David Goldman/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Tumbling down: In the aftermath of Charlottesville’s violence, as white nationalists and pro-Confederate groups announce more rallies and speaking events, several cities are accelerating the removal of their Confederate memorials. In addition to protestors toppling a statue in Durham, The Los Angeles Times reports:

In Atlanta, protesters spray-painted a statue of a Confederate soldier and broke off a piece. Dozens of people gathered in Nashville and hundreds more in San Antonio to protest local monuments.

The gatherings followed formal announcements in at least five cities that monuments would be taken down.

  • In Boston, three headliners have dropped out of a far-right rally planned for this weekend after Mayor Martin Walsh and other leaders have made it clear that hate groups are not welcome. (Boston Globe)

Stepping in: California has become the first state to sue the Trump administration over its sanctuary cities policy, joining San Francisco and Chicago in fighting against a new Justice Department policy denying grants to jurisdictions that fail to provide the feds access to local jails. (Politico)

High-Line-ification: As cities clamor to emulate the New York City icon on their own industrial spaces, a chorus of detractors is also growing against high-cost projects that bring segregation, gentrification, and Disney-style tourism. Reflecting on the failure of London’s Garden Bridge project, The Guardian suggests more focus on locals, more crowdfunding, and creative site choices.

Say what?: You know those unreadable Public Notice signs? Atlanta is doing away with them as part of a broad rebranding of its Department of City Planning (motto: “To Be Clear is to Be Kind”) that focuses on clean typography, colorful applications, and sharply designed notices. (Fast Co.Design)

Right-sizing NYC tolls: As New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo appears to warm to the idea of congestion pricing in New York City, Streetsblog argues that the latest toll reform plan from Move NY eases past concerns by distributing costs fairly between all of the city’s boroughs.

The urban lens:

Old #bricks in the #asphalt, #moonah. #citylab #citylabontheground

A post shared by Olivia Bowman (@livbgood) on

Share your city on Instagram with #citylabontheground

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a map of future climate risks in the U.S.
    Maps

    America After Climate Change, Mapped

    With “The 2100 Project: An Atlas for A Green New Deal,” the McHarg Center tries to visualize how the warming world will reshape the United States.

  2. Perspective

    Why Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

    In cities like New York, Paris, Rotterdam, and soon San Francisco, car-free streets are emerging amid a growing movement.

  3. photo: a commuter looks at a small map of the London Tube in 2009
    Maps

    Help! The London Tube Map Is Out of Control.

    It’s never been easy to design a map of the city’s underground transit network. But soon, critics say, legibility concerns will demand a new look.

  4. Design

    New York City Will Require Bird-Friendly Glass on Buildings

    Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds smash into the city’s buildings every year. The city council just passed a bill to cut back on the carnage.

  5. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

×