Donald Trump is pictured in Phoenix.
Joshua Roberts/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Rally night: Despite some tear gas and bottle-throwing in Phoenix yesterday, along with some controversial statements from President Donald Trump, the campaign rally that seemed ripe for combustion ultimately didn’t stoke the type of partisan or racial violence that some feared. Politico reports:

The city shrewdly blocked off the thoroughfares in between the convention center and the areas in which protesters congregated. The sheer labor required to cross the street acted as a deterrent. And even then, there wasn’t much kindling to set off a Charlottesville-like street brawl. There were no white supremacists or neo-Nazis in evidence. Aside from the odd anarcho-communist gun club, there were barely any armed groups either—and that’s in a proudly open-carry state.

Anti-terrorism tactics: After the terrorism in Barcelona, European cities continue to experiment with physical barriers to prevent vehicular attacks in public spaces. Miami, meanwhile, responds to the threat by installing bollards along its internationally known South Beach promenade. (New York Times, Miami Herald)

Teaming with Uber: Five cities in central Florida are trying out a unique partnership with Uber to subsidize all rides by 20 percent, and all rides to SunRail stations by 25 percent. (Next City)

Highway building: Shreveport, Louisiana officials have voted to move forward on a 3.5-mile connector freeway slicing through the lower-income neighborhood of Allendale. Streetsblog’s take: “Mayor votes to bulldoze a black neighborhood to build a highway.”

“Music urbanism:” Providing examples of innovative music nonprofits in cities including Memphis and Detroit, CityMetric promotes “music urbanism” as a study of the ways music can go beyond nightlife and festivals to improve the daily fabric of a city.

The urban lens:

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