A photograph of two beers
Marcos Brindicci/Reuters

We’ll be searching for the city’s lost soul with “Vanishing New York” blogger and author Jeremiah Moss.

Later this month, we’ll be hosting another HappyHourLab in NYC. We’ve loved bringing readers together for these in-person evenings of cocktails and conversation. The past installments in Washington, D.C., and Brooklyn sold out, so make sure to reserve your spot ASAP! We’re excited to see new faces and soon-to-be-regulars alike. (For those of you in other cities, keep an eye out for future events near you.)

When: Thursday, August 17 at 7:30 p.m.

Where: The Bedford (110 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn)

What: A HappyHourLab conversation between CityLab’s Laura Bliss and Jeremiah Moss, blogger and author of new book Vanishing New York: How a Great City Lost Its Soul.

Register here. We look forward to seeing you!

About the Author

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