Suburban homes are pictured in Fresno, California.
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

The suburban future: As Census Bureau statistics show Millennials increasingly moving to the suburbs, The New York Times imagines the technology and design that will help them achieve the version of suburbia they desire:

Millennial suburbanites want a new kind of landscape. They want breathing room but disdain the energy wastefulness, visual monotony and social conformity of postwar manufactured neighborhoods. If new suburbs can hit the sweet spot that accommodates the priorities of that generation, millennial habitats will redefine everyday life for all suburbanites, which is 70 percent of Americans.

St. Louis in protest: The city saw a weekend of demonstrations after former police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted Friday on charges of first-degree murder in the fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith in 2011. (The Washington Post)

Approximate urbanism: Apple’s new “town square” model fits into a trend of tech companies championing urban, civic values with its privately owned space—in rhetoric, at least. (BuzzFeed)

End of the line: The demise of Pier 55, the floating park planned for West Manhattan, could symbolize “the end of an era of benefactor-led boutique urbanism” that has riffed off the High Line model, according to Fast Company.

Music at the Tank: Artists and musicians are flocking to to the unlikely destination of Rangely, Colorado—a small conservative town of oil and gas workers—to appreciate a music venue built out of a water tank. (Los Angeles Times)

The urban lens:

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