A Chicago Police officer prepares to inventory a hand gun turned in from the public as part of the "Gun Turn-in" event. Jim Young/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Grisly stats: To illustrate the stark reality of gun violence in American cities, The New York Times compares the one-day death toll from the mass shooting in Las Vegas with how many days it took for guns to claim the same number of lives in other cities. In Baltimore, those 58 gun deaths are found in the past 68 days. In Detroit, it’s the past 121 days. In Chicago, you don’t even have to go back a full month.

On alert: With Tropical Storm Nate looming in the Gulf of Mexico, the mayor of New Orleans has declared a state of emergency as city crews scramble to clear up hundreds of clogged storm drains. The drainage system already proved its frailty over the summer, causing major floods. (Times-Picayune)

Fitter, happier in the city: A new study looking at U.K. cities vs. suburbs finds people living in dense urban areas have lower levels of obesity and higher levels of exercise than those living in sprawl. Downtown residents are also more likely to be socially engaged, according to the study from Oxford and the University of Hong Kong. (Guardian)

Walmart’s big bet: Seeking an edge over Amazon, Walmart is ramping up its grocery pickup service, now available at 1,000 locations across the country. The strategy “is betting big on the millions of Americans in suburban and rural areas who drive everywhere.” (New York Times)

Ban “gritty”: Please stop using that word to describe Detroit. That’s the call from the city’s mayor-appointed chief storyteller, journalist Aaron Foley, who writes that the now-empty phrase puts Detroit residents “in the position of being pitied over.” (CNN)

The bike mayor movement: Reuters checks in on the “bike mayor” of Mexico City, one of seven volunteers who now hold the unofficial title in cities worldwide. The growing movement, set up by an Amsterdam advocacy group, aspires for half of all urban trips to be made by bike by 2030.

Holy spirits? Across the country at least 10 vacated church buildings have converted into new breweries since 2011, and a handful more are on the way. (AP)

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