A woman makes a sign at a vigil on the Las Vegas strip.
Chris Wattie/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

“Soft target”: Though Las Vegas had seen attempts at mass violence before, and beefed up security in recent years, the essential nature of Sin City—with so many tourists, resorts, and venues squeezed in together—has also seemed its greatest vulnerability to attacks. Calling Sunday’s massacre unthinkable, “yet somehow not unpredictable,” New York Magazine writes:

Still, going back to 9/11—and even before—there was an awareness of the potential for a violent attacker to cause devastation. “Everybody knows that Las Vegas is something of a soft target because there are so many outdoor attractions on the Strip that can never be secured,” a board member with the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, who asked not to be named, told me. “A truck bomb at a busy intersection is almost impossible to prevent, and, bam—our economy’s dead.”

Recovery jam: Puerto Rico’s “very American” car dependence—the island has one of the highest rates of car ownership in the world, and an “unloved” public transit system—has harmed hurricane recovery as drivers compete for limited gas and remain cut off from their jobs. (Bloomberg)

Uber alternative: The campaign in London to set up “Khan cars”— a driver-owned cooperative named after the city’s mayor—could take some lessons from Texas, in the successes and failures of the nonprofit RideAustin service. (Fast Company)

Constant turnover: The scandal that caused Seattle Mayor Ed Murray to resign may have been an exceptional case, but for Seattleites it’s nothing new to have a mayor depart before their second term. Next month the city will elect its fourth mayor in as many elections. (Governing)

Downtown pass: Columbus, Ohio, will offer free public transit passes to anyone working downtown‚ even if those people don’t intend to use them. (Guardian)

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