Haven Daley/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Sanctuary showdown: In the latest saga of a battle some experts predict may wind up in the Supreme Court, a federal judge yesterday issued a permanent block to the White House’s order to withhold funding from sanctuary cities that don’t comply with federal immigration authorities. As The Washington Post reports, the judge cited constitutional conflicts with the order:

The ruling by District Judge William H. Orrick in San Francisco comes in response to a lawsuit filed by the city of San Francisco and nearby Santa Clara County and follows a temporary halt on the order that the judge issued in April.

Orrick, in his summary of the case Monday, found that the Trump administration’s efforts to move local officials to cooperate with its efforts to deport undocumented immigrants violated the separation of powers doctrine as well as the Fifth and Tenth amendments.

Where the streets have new names: Atlanta streets named after Confederate leaders such as General Robert E. Lee will likely be renamed in coming months, per an expected announcement from Mayor Kasim Reed that takes its cue from months of public hearings and studies. It’s unclear what the new names will be, or what will become of dozens of other monuments and markers of Confederate icons. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution)

“Unofficial delegation”: While the Trump administration may have been “the most unwelcome attendees” at last week’s U.N. climate summit in Bonn, an unofficial delegation of local U.S. leaders made its presence felt, affirming commitment to the Paris accord. The Washington Post notes the broader trend: A “coterie of governors and mayors from some of America’s most wealthiest and most dynamic parts of the country” are working to strengthen global diplomacy in the face of the White House agenda.

  • See also: Democracy Now! chats with Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto, who was active in the Bonn contingent—and still steamed about Trump’s claim of representing “the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris.”

Dangerous drives: The U.S. is a “disturbing outlier” on traffic safety, with “the most dangerous roads in the industrialized world,” writes New York Times columnist David Leonhardt. The U.S. vehicle fatality rate is about 40 percent higher than Canada or Australia. Self-driving car tech may promises safer streets down the road, Leonhardt says, but “we don’t have to wait … to do better.”

Road show: New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is taking his advocacy on the road, insisting that the fight for his city’s interests “doesn’t end at the edge of the five boroughs.” While the mayor says he has no presidential ambitions, some view his headlining appearance at an Iowa fundraiser next month as the “kickoff to a travel-heavy second term.” (Medium.com, New York Times)

Meet your makers: A new National League of Cities report suggests that city leaders aren’t paying enough attention to their small-scale manufacturers, who could present new opportunities for job growth and redevelopment of vacant lots. (Route Fifty)

America, still stuck: New Census data shows that migration within the U.S. remains at historically low rates, with residents avoiding long-distance moves for jobs and for the most part sticking within their same counties. Millennials, however, are showing a slight uptick with bigger moves. (Brookings)

The urban lens:

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