Uber and Lyft logos are pictured.
Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Problems sharing: A new survey from the National League of Cities finds cities have mixed attitudes toward the sharing economy as more urban partnerships develop. A third of cities described their relationship with Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb as “very poor”—but more than half said the relationships were “very good” or “good,” and 7 percent chose the word “tenuous.” Fast Company reports:

All cities would like the sharing giants to share more data, Rainwater says. … Uber’s Movement platform provides data on 2 billion trips around the world and is a step in the right direction. But Rainwater notes that it isn’t real-time and it doesn’t give city managers a comprehensive picture of what happening at a street-by-street level.

Cities and the sharing economy still seem to be feeling each other out, working out whether they should cooperate or be wary.

Trump’s response to the church shooting: After a shooting at a Texas church left 26 dead, President Donald Trump, traveling in Japan, said the issue was not “a guns situation,” but “a mental health problem at the highest level.” (Governing)

Mayoral shifts: A white woman is currently the frontrunner for Tuesday’s mayoral race in Atlanta, “the celebrated base of African-American cultural, economic and political power that has only had black mayors since the Ford administration,” while three other majority-black Southern cities—Savannah, Memphis, and New Orleans—have recently broken long streaks of black political power by electing white mayors. (New York Times)

Activating voters: Grassroots efforts in Allentown, Pennsylvania, are aiming to get more residents to the polls in a city where 15 percent of registered voters elected the last mayor—a man who’s currently under indictment for 54 counts of fraud, bribery, and extortion as he bids for a new term. (Next City)

Housing petri dish: Tiny houses for the poor, a land bank-sponsored renovation program, and no-interest financing for teardowns are among the experiments Detroit is trying to boost a housing market where prices are too low for lenders to take risks, yet too high for residents to buy. (New York Times)

No homes here: Both Toronto and Vancouver have tried cooling down their housing markets by imposing taxes on foreign buyers, but should Canada go even further—like the government of New Zealand just did—and completely ban foreign buyers from buying existing homes? (Vice News)

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