An Uber driver is pictured.
David Gray/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Uber’s good news: In Uber’s troubled relationship with Europe, one area has emerged as a rare bright spot: the Baltic nations. In Estonia this week, lawmakers legalized the ride-share giant’s operations, following moves by Latvia and Lithuania to regulate and clarify ride-hailing services’ legal status. It’s a case where Uber’s investment in navigating a country’s politics has ultimately paid off, Politico notes:

By putting taxis and private-hire vehicles on a similar footing, the new law significantly lessens the previous regulatory burden on taxis while still regulating private vehicles. Everyone will have to apply for a license, vehicle card and service card. App-based services won’t have to use a meter or specific signage.

New Orleans’ first female mayor: Two African-American candidates—a community organizer turned councilwoman and a prominent judge with local lineage—are in a tight race to win “the first truly post-Katrina mayoral election” in the Big Easy. (Next City)

Local news take a hit: The owner of the DNAInfo and the Gothamist network of local news websites—which includes DCist, Chicagoist, among several other city “ists”—shut down operations on all sites Thursday, a week after the New York newsroom voted to unionize. (New York Times)

Living room concerts: Airbnb has ambitions for becoming “the best platform to find music experiences and concerts,” according to a job posting that reveals the company’s desire to go “global scale” with a format for intimate live gigs held in the homes of Airbnb hosts. (Variety)

The urbanist angle on #MeToo: With sexual harassment dominating the news, Greater Greater Washington notes the significance for urban policy: harassment on streets, transit, and ride-hailing services can work against cities’ goals to reduce driving and encourage use of public space.

The urban lens:

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