LaToya Cantrell is pictured
Cantrell Campaign

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Election win: New Orleans is now poised to have its first female mayor in the city’s 300-year history—and also the first Big Easy “outsider” to hold the post since the 1960s. City council member LaToya Cantrell, who won Saturday’s election in a landslide, first gained a political following in helping her neighborhood recover from Hurricane Katrina. USA Today reports:

Cantrell will face lingering problems even as New Orleans tourism has rebounded and blight has been reduced. Crime is one. Another is dysfunction at the agency overseeing the city’s drinking water system and storm drainage—a problem that became evident during serious flash flooding in August.

Katrina was a theme in the backstory of both candidates. Cantrell moved to the city from California. Her work as a neighborhood activist in the aftermath of Katrina in the hard-hit Broadmoor neighborhood helped her win a seat on council in 2012.

Post-Brexit spoils: A secret ballot today will determine which two cities get to host key European Union institutions the United Kingdom will lose with Brexit—the banking and medical agencies, together accounting for about 1,000 top jobs. Nineteen cities in Europe are vying for the agencies, in a competition that’s “part Olympic host city bidding, part Eurovision Song Contest,” AP writes.

Bike-sharing disruption: The phenomenon of dockless bike-sharing, driven by two Chinese companies and entering the U.S. during the past year, could be the “disruptive innovation” that either explodes bike-sharing’s popularity or muddies the already crowded playing field. (Politico Magazine)

  • See also: The explosion of bike-sharing in China over the past three years has propelled a frenzy over “the sharing economy,” with investors throwing money at just about venture offering short-term services activated by smartphone. (New York Times Magazine)

Route 66’s lesser-known cousin: A new museum will celebrate the pop culture history of what may be America’s longest commercial street—Colfax Avenue, jammed with “freaks, neon and occasional peril” as it cuts 53 miles through Denver and other Colorado towns. The man in charge of the effort: a semi-retired Elvis impersonator who’s known as the unofficial historian of the street. (Los Angeles Times)

Rise of the ‘plantscaper’: In Sweden, a giant indoor hydroponics farm called “The World Food Building” will produce enough vegetables to feed 5,500 people per year—a project its creators believe can be replicated in cities worldwide. (Business Insider)

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