Opioid pills are pictured.
George Frey/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Taking on Big Pharm: Two years ago, Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood became the first state attorney to sue a prescription drugmaker for its role in the opioid crisis. In the time since, more than 100 states, cities, and counties have pursued similar lawsuits—a trend many see echoing the fight against big tobacco in the late ‘90s. Governing reports:

One significant difference between the opioid cases and the tobacco cases is that counties and cities are filing suit this time—not just the states.

“[The tobacco] litigation was successful, but states kept all that money. None of it flowed down to the counties,” says Paul Hanly, a partner with Simmons Hanly Conroy, which is representing more than a dozen counties in opioid lawsuits and has already settled similar cases on behalf of patients.

Climate promises: As 25 mayors from cities around the world pledged to cut carbon emissions to net zero by 2050, an alliance of U.S. cities, states, and businesses stood in opposition to Donald Trump at this weekend’s Bonn conference for climate change, taking “America’s pledge” to combat global warming. (Reuters, Guardian)

Deportation defense: Eleven U.S. cities and counties, including Chicago and Baltimore, have joined a network to provide free legal counsel for undocumented immigrants facing deportation—joining a wave of states and cities that have tried for similar programs. (NPR)

Quake-proof buildings: Following September’s massive earthquake, experts are calling for Mexico City to catalog its buildings based on seismic resiliency — a costly and politically difficult prospect, but one that Los Angeles has already waded through. (L.A. Times)

Bill Gates’ smart city: A Bill Gates-run investment firm is putting $80 million toward develop a planned community west of Phoenix that will show off “smart city” tech. (Popular Mechanics)

The urban lens:

Show us your city on Instagram using #citylabontheground.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    At Atlanta’s Rail Stations, a Transit-Oriented Soccer League Takes Shape

    Swaths of empty space at train stations are being turned into athletic fields for kids and adults.

  2. Design

    Lisbon’s Beautiful, Dangerous Sidewalks

    The artistic and slippery “Portuguese pavement” has become Lisbon’s calling card. City Hall wants to replace a few stretches of them with concrete—a seemingly sensible decision that has sparked outrage.

  3. Two men shake hands across a table at a job fair.
    Life

    Wages Are Higher in Urban Areas, But Growing Faster in Rural Ones

    The picture of wages and salaries across the U.S. is not a simple one of urban success versus rural decline.

  4. Transportation

    Beverly Hills Has Financed Its Metro Fight With $13 Million In Local Taxes

    Instead of reconstructing aging school facilities, the district is using a voter-backed ballot measure to pay for a legal campaign against a subway extension.

  5. Life

    Uber, but for Driving Your Kids Around

    A slew of small companies have launched in recent years, offering parents a way to outsource their daily driving.