A self-driving car is pictured.
Brian Snyder/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

“From my cold, dead hands”: With the self-driving car revolution predicted to arrive within the next two decades, we may be facing “the next great battleground of America’s culture wars,” The Week writes. Picking up on the prediction from former General Motors VP Bob Lutz that “human-driven vehicles will be legislated off the highways,” The Week expects a messy fight to come:

Some social media users were thrilled by Lutz's prediction, commenting on the technology's potential safety aspects and how it could make commuting easier. But plenty of others were horrified at the prospect. Lots of "… from my cold, dead hands" tweets, for instance, a reference to the well-known National Rifle Association slogan. For these people, such knee-jerk opposition to driverless cars is all about maintaining personal autonomy and withstanding yet another elite assault on their lifestyle.

So you can see how this is going to play out, right? Just wait until Fox & Friends notices this issue, which means it will immediately land on President Trump's radar. And then the tweets will begin...

Jobs within reach: Measuring job access via transit, new rankings put New York, San Francisco, and Chicago on top of the 49 biggest metro regions, with Cincinnati showing the most improvement over last year’s scores from the University of Minnesota. (Streetsblog)

Universal income test: In North Carolina, the annual payment each tribal member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians receives from casino revenue could provide a case study of whether universal basic income is practical, or “just another oversimplified, undercooked Silicon Valley fix to one of the most intractable problems our society faces,” Wired writes.

Overdose mapping: An app first developed to track drug overdose deaths in Baltimore is now in use in 27 states, providing real-time data on fatal and non-fatal overdoses to more than 250 local health and law-enforcement agencies. (Stateline)

Riverfront investments: UrbanLand examines how transformational waterfront parks in Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Cincinnati have come to generate big revenue for their cities—in Pittsburgh, for instance, with $20 in private investment following every public dollar.

The urban lens:

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