Doug Jones acknowledges supporters at the election night party in Birmingham REUTERS/Marvin Gentry

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Alabama upset: The long-shot victory of Democrat Doug Jones in Tuesday’s heated Alabama Senate race rested on voters from the state’s cities, most affluent suburbs, and black communities, who soundly rejected the controversial candidacy of Republican Roy Moore. The Washington Post breaks down the numbers:

Fully 96 percent of African Americans supported Jones, similar to President Obama’s 95 percent support among this group in 2012. But Jones fared much better than Obama among white voters, garnering 30 percent of their votes, twice the 15 percent who voted for Obama. Jones made particularly large gains among white women and those with college degrees.

When Airbnb acts like Uber: A Bloomberg View columnist sees Uber-like problems with the other sharing economy leader, Airbnb, in its recent “overaggressive expansion and tendency to ignore rules”—as top tourist destinations like Paris, Berlin, and Barcelona attempt to slap on tighter regulations.

Source of the fire: The blaze that damaged one of Los Angeles’s most affluent neighborhoods last week was sparked accidentally by some of the city’s poorest residents, according to officials who traced the source to a cooking fire in a homeless encampment in the canyons. The fire tore through 400 acres, destroying and damaging homes in the Bel-Air neighborhood. (L.A. Times)

Safer in sanctuaries? Rebutting the White House’s message that sanctuary cities are breeding grounds for crime, a new analysis of 33 big cities suggests that white residents living in sanctuary areas are safer from deadly violence. The study found less consistent results, however, for people of color. (Crime Report)

The urbanization of Dallas: How does a sprawling, car-centric city like Dallas feed the growing appetite for walkable, urban lifestyles? A Curbed overview points to baby steps toward higher density and mixed-use neighborhoods, like the budding Deep Ellum district.

The urban lens:

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