Washington, DC

An illustration of Gothamist logos being packed up.

Everyone Should Fear What Happened to the Gothamist Sites

Five U.S. cities just lost a critical source of local news. The former LAist editor explains why it’s so troubling that they were silenced.

Passengers board a bus at the airport.

Why Doesn't Google Maps Know the Best Way to the Airport?

The app often ignores airport transit services, even if they’re faster or cheaper. (But Bing might have it figured out.)

D.C. Gives Uber and Lyft a Better Spot in Nightlife

In a popular bar area, the District wants to see what happens when it removes parking spaces to make room for ride-hailing services.

When Should Commuters Ditch Transit for Uber?

D.C. offers an early look at how cities can take advantage of the data Uber makes available to them.

A LimeBike is pictured next to a Capital Bikeshare dock.

Bike Share, Unplanned

Three private bike-share companies are determined to shake up the streets of D.C. But what, exactly, are they trying to disrupt?

An illustration of rats is pictured.

Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?

The age-old strategy is “see a rat, kill a rat.” The new plan is to end an infestation before it ever begins.

Bridj Collapses After Just 3 Years

The bus company trying to bridge public transit with ride-hailing shuts down after failing to secure new investment.

A cyclist in Washington, D.C.

No, Police Should Not Fine Cyclists Who Wear Headphones

Ticky-tacky penalties are no way to accomplish Vision Zero, especially if they won’t be enforced equitably.

The New York City skyline

Leave the Liberal City Alone

America’s biggest, wealthiest cities aren’t succeeding at the expense of others, and breaking them up just doesn’t make sense.

 Boston city worker clears a snowy sidewalk.

To Fight Snow Storms, Bring Out the Big Data

Cities like Boston aren’t just rolling out the heavy-duty plow trucks. Analytic tools are helping them to make snow removal a smarter and more efficient process.

For Most Cities, the Tech Boom Is a Bust

Contrary to technology’s image as an equalizer, digital service jobs in United States have clustered and concentrated in a select few metros.

Can D.C's Homeless Live in Discarded Subway Cars?

Visionary architect Arthur Cotton Moore’s latest idea: an affordable housing project built out of old Metro cars.

The Library of Congress under construction and the U.S. Capitol

No, Washington Is Not Built on a Swamp

It’s time to retire an old metaphor that has no basis in D.C.’s history.

What a Refugee Chef Wants You to Know About the 'Day Without Immigrants'

Ryan McCaskey, the chef and proprietor at Chicago’s Michelin-starred Acadia restaurant, was evacuated from Vietnam as a toddler. Here’s why he shut down his restaurant in support of immigrant workers.

What Could Reverse D.C'.s Intense School Segregation?

Not more charter schools, says the author of a new UCLA Civil Rights Project report: School choice is only exacerbating the effects of the city’s extreme housing segregation.

Word Up! D.C. Will Get a Museum of Linguistics

Can “Planet Word”—an interactive museum of language—bring new life to a long-vacant historic D.C. building?

Breathing Life Into Northern Virginia's Notorious 'Concrete Canyon'

Could these face-lifts turn lackluster Rosslyn, with its impossible waterfront, into a place that people actually want to go?

Why Cities Will Be Protest Hubs in 2017

The author Sarah Jaffe sheds light on why urban areas are hotspots for demonstrations.

Mapping Who Will Be Hurt by D.C. Metro's Late-Night Cuts

Service workers will likely have fewer safe, affordable ways to get home after late shifts.

D.C.'s Battle for Paid Family Leave

City-council members in the nation’s capital are preparing for a final vote on what could be the most expansive parental-leave law in the United States.