Also: Robert Venturi made suburbia matter, and a bridge between tech and city hall.

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What We’re Following

Moving on up: We know that where children grow up can affect their future opportunities. It can be a challenge, though, to find a place that offers access to upward mobility, and families have to weigh rent and income against the many factors that make up a good community. Now, a new project from economist Raj Chetty and the Census Bureau is mapping where economic prospects improve from one neighborhood to the next.

Using a new tool, the Opportunity Atlas, it’s possible to identify which Census tracts are “opportunity bargains,” affordable areas that offer a high chance of escaping poverty. Knowing that could offer a much better chance to help poor and minority kids get a better shot at moving up the economic ladder, either by showing where to move or how cities can improve. CityLab’s Tanvi Misra zoomed into Detroit on the map to see how this trove of data could help. Read about the neighborhoods that offer a ‘bargain’ on upward mobility.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Robert Venturi Effect

The “father of postmodernism” had a seismic impact on architecture—and on me.

Kate Wagner

‘Startup in Residence' Builds a Bridge Between Tech and City Hall

A four-month program that started in San Francisco is now helping entrepreneurs across the nation tap into the $400 billion gov-tech industry.

Linda Poon

Welcome to Dayton, Ohio: The Land of Funk

The Ohio Players, Lakeside, Slave, Zapp. In the ‘70s and ‘80s, Dayton was a hotbed of funk bands. With the opening of a new museum, the city is claiming its position as “The Land of Funk.”

Melissa A. Weber

D.C.’s Universal Preschool Program Has Been Hugely Beneficial for Moms—and the Economy

Once preschool was made free, maternal labor force participation increased.

Dwyer Gunn

An Appalachian Elegy for Patsy Cline’s Hometown

John Lingan, author of the new book Homeplace, talks about the shifting socioeconomic divides in Winchester, Virginia, birthplace of the country singer.

Leah Angstman



What We’re Reading

Where is Elaine Chao? (Politico)

Elon Musk settled with the SEC, but Tesla’s troubles aren’t over (New York Times)

When private dollars pay for public spaces (Next City)

I lived in a Tokyo co-working space (Curbed)

California gives BART control of developing its parking lots (San Francisco Chronicle)


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