Gary Kazanjian/AP

Also today: How to fix badly planned American cities, and Gritty of brotherly love.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Running a temperature: The stakes of worldwide climate change have been laid out in their most uncertain terms yet, and it’s even worse than we thought. If greenhouse gases warm the atmosphere by as much as 1.5 degree Celsius, the worst consequences of climate change will be unleashed, according to a landmark report released Monday by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. To avoid this path, the world needs to slash emissions nearly in half by 2030 and go completely carbon neutral by 2050. That calls for unprecedented (and perhaps near-impossible) global action, from implementing carbon taxes to virtually ceasing coal burning.

But before you plunge into a dark pit of hopelessness, take heed: Reducing emissions from transportation may be the most important change that cities can make, and even individual behavior can make a dent on this front, Laura Bliss writes on CityLab today: “Those with the ability to decide whether to drive, walk, scoot, hail an Uber, take the bus, or book a flight are the critical agents in the mode shifts the IPCC reports describe.” Read Bliss’s call to action on how your transportation choices matter.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A Step-by-Step Guide for Fixing Badly Planned American Cities

An excerpt from Jeff Speck’s Walkable City Rules, a step-by-step guide to fixing America’s cities and towns.

Jeff Speck

Goodbye, Columbus Day

How cities turned against a controversial holiday.  

Karim Doumar

For Once, Racism Didn’t Work in Defending a Chicago Police Officer

The police officer who killed Laquan McDonald was convicted on Friday, despite a "Black Boogeyman" stereotype he cited to justify his fear of the unarmed teenager.

Brentin Mock

Megacity vs. Super Typhoon

Can Asia’s booming coastal metropolises survive the intensifying storms of the Pacific Ocean?

Linda Poon

Will Quebec’s New, Pro-Highway Government Collide With Montreal?

A newly elected center-right party could put the province in ideological opposition to its biggest city, a left-leaning metropolis with a mayor that has promised better public transit, social inclusion, and sustainable development.

Tracey Lindeman


Gritty of Brotherly Love

(Matt Slocum/AP)

We’re not exactly sure what the Philadelphia Flyers had in mind when they were looking for a new mascot, but what they got was Gritty. The fuzzy 7-foot-tall orange hellion whose googly eyes and maniacal grin seemed engineered to unnerve became ubiquitous after some negative national attention. So of course, contrarian Philadelphians rallied around the monster. With President Trump’s visit to the city earlier this month, the hockey mascot became a symbol of resistance for an angry time. Today on CityLab: There’s Something About Gritty


What We’re Reading

Uber joins the push for road tolling in Seattle (Seattle Times)

Americans’ trust in local government is increasing (Gallup)

An equation to measure and manage the curb (Wired)

Can hip-hop make architecture more equitable? (Curbed)

Yoko Ono brings the sky underground in New York subway mural (Hyperallergic)


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