Also: HQ2 was always about transit, and the skyscraper dividing Quebec City.

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What We’re Following

Turkey trot: It seems to come earlier each year. No, I’m not talking about the Christmas music that’s piped into the mall. I’m talking about the pilgrimage to the Thanksgiving table. More people are expected to travel this year than in any of the past 13 years, according to AAA. It looks like peak Thanksgiving traffic is coming earlier, too: An estimated 48.5 million people will travel by car, and Tuesday is increasingly becoming the worst day for Turkey Day traffic in many American cities. Meanwhile, only 1.48 million people will travel by train, bus, or boat.

The roadside assistance organization also finds that more people (about 4.27 million total) are flying this year, citing increased disposable income for travelers. While Wednesday is still the biggest flight day of the holiday week, it’s actually bit of a myth that the day before Thanksgiving is the busiest flight day of the year. That honor belongs to summertime, somewhere around July 14 or August 7, depending on the year. Either way, you better get going. Here are some tips to help you out: Avoid Thanksgiving Traffic, With Science


More on CityLab

Amazon’s HQ2 Decision Was Always About Transit

In the end, New York’s MTA and D.C.’s Metro were the only transportation networks capable of handling such an influx of new residents. But both cities will have some work to do.

Laura Bliss

The Skyscraper Dividing Quebec City

Le Phare would stand 65-stories high in Sainte-Foy, an old, low-lying suburb of the historic city.

Tracey Lindeman

The Case for Deconstruction

Builders must imagine at the beginning of a structure’s life what will happen at the end of it.

Rex LaMore, George H. Berghorn, and M.G. Matt Syal

Why Drivers Are Leading a Protest Movement Across France

The rapidly developing “Yellow Vest” movement took over streets and highways to oppose rising gas and diesel taxes. It might also be a proxy for frustrations about rising costs and falling living standards.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Stop Complaining About Your Rent and Move to Tulsa, Suggests Tulsa

In an effort to beef up the city’s tech workforce, the George Kaiser Family Foundation is offering $10,000, free rent, and other perks to remote workers who move to Tulsa for a year.

Sarah Holder


Next Stop: A Better Bus Network

(Alon Levy, Eric Goldwyn)

Brooklyn’s bus system is careening into crisis: Ridership has declined by 20 percent over the last decade and one in four buses arrives off schedule. Still, the network is worth rebuilding. The buses serve nearly 190 million rides per year, and it’s a cheap way to take advantage of the already high-quality road networks in the city.

Redesigning a bus network to harness the power of the bus with priority and frequency is typically the domain of transit planners and consultants, but Eric Goldwyn and Alon Levy of NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management have offered up a new map for Brooklyn, gratis! Read their perspective and see their interactive map: A Fantasy Map for Brooklyn’s Bus Network that’s Grounded in Reality


What We’re Reading

What can Washington do to fix the geography of opportunity? (Politico Magazine)

Do rents really go down in the winter? (Curbed)

Airports cracked Uber and Lyft—time for cities to take note (Wired)

Inside an Amazon warehouse on Black Friday (Vox)


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