Also: Millennials are more likely to buy their first homes in cities, and communities of color are more vulnerable to wildfire.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Thanks, but you shouldn’t have: It’s only been two days since Amazon announced its HQ2 winners, and already politicians and activists in New York and Virginia are contemplating what they’d like to get in return for the massive incentive packages used to lure the tech giant. They may even have some ways to claw back some of the more than $2 billion that’s been offered to Amazon.

In Virginia, the expenditures committed to Amazon must still be approved by lawmakers in the next budget, providing a potential avenue for resistance. Meanwhile, New York has a more complicated route, as city council members and state senators find ways to maneuver around a deal that Governor Andrew Cuomo all but renamed himself to ink. CityLab’s Sarah Holder has the rundown on all the ways that people in Queens and Arlington could thwart the economic incentives deals—or at least steer them toward more direct community investments. Today on CityLab: Inside the Movement to Derail Amazon HQ2 Incentives

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Millennials Are More Likely to Buy Their First Homes in Cities

New research finds that Millennials are 21 percent more likely to buy their first homes near city centers than Generation X.

Amanda Kolson Hurley

Communities of Color Are More Vulnerable to Wildfire

A study finds census tracts that are majority black, Hispanic, or Native American experience about 50 percent greater vulnerability to wildfire.

Nicole Javorsky

A Car Ban That Paris and Its Suburbs Can Actually Agree On

France’s most comprehensive car ban marks an important moment of cooperation for oft-quarreling municipalities.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Cities That Lost Amazon's HQ2 Contest Can Still End Up Ahead

There’s a silver lining for the 235 places that did not win.

Aaron Renn

The Bitterest Lesson of the Brexit Deal

Amid resignations, it's clear the U.K. government massively misjudged how leaving the European Union would play out.

Feargus O'Sullivan


What We’re Reading

Who’s bucking the trend on diversity in tech jobs? (Next City)

What cities offered Amazon: helipads, zoo tickets, streets named Alexa (The Guardian)

When Elon Musk tunnels under your home (The Atlantic)

Why Uber and Lyft are rolling out loyalty programs (Quartz)

How new cash to fight homelessness in San Francisco could mean less reliance on police (The Appeal)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  2. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  3. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

  4. Design

    Long Before Levittown, Brooklyn Boasted Mass-Produced Housing

    The small community of Gerritsen Beach was a pioneering cookie-cutter suburb in the 1920s.

  5. Bianca Wylie, a leading voice opposing Sidewalk Labs' dramatic neighborhood development plan in Toronto.
    Life

    Meet the Jane Jacobs of the Smart Cities Age

    All eyes are on Sidewalk Labs' futuristic plans for a data-driven neighborhood in Toronto. But no one's watching more closely than Bianca Wylie.

×