Also: What is Mitch Landrieu running for? And autism-friendly apartments open in Phoenix.

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What We’re Following

Get a room: The days of Brangelina are long gone, but the idea of the power couple remains eternal. While the term conjures up celebrity images, social researchers have actually used it for decades to describe college-educated, well-earning married pairs. In fact, these couples have been a big factor in the back-to-the-city movement, even before it accelerated in the 2000s: About half of these “power couples” lived in large metro areas in 1990.

A new study has brought the numbers up to date for the Beyoncé and Jay-Z era, and CityLab’s Richard Florida digs into how this phenomenon affects where people choose to live—and how gender still shapes the geography of work. Today on CityLab: The Rise of the Urban Power Couple.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

For Some Drivers, Uber Offers New Benefit: Full-Ride Scholarships

Starting Thursday, high-performing Uber drivers can earn tuition-free online education from Arizona State University.

Sarah Holder

Mitch Landrieu Is Not Running From Race

The former New Orleans mayor wants everyone to know that there is a way to talk about race in America, and Donald Trump—that ain’t it.

Brentin Mock

Autism-Friendly Apartments Open in Phoenix

The 55-unit First Place complex was designed specifically for adults with autism and neurodiversities.

Sophie Haigney

The Stark Geography of U.S. Immigration Raids

According to a new report, 24 out of 3,200 counties see around half of all of ICE’s community arrests.

Tanvi Misra

How Will Pittsburgh’s Jews Translate Tragedy Into Action?

The Jewish community disagreed about what to do when President Donald Trump came to town—and how to take action after tragedy.

Emma Green


Dwelling on the Past

It is high time for architects, planners and builders to accept their large share of responsibility for the dangerous trend toward complete racial and economic segregation. We have been far too exclusively concerned with the techniques for “neighborhood planning,” while ignoring the fact that zoning, restrictive agreements and large-scale building enterprise (public as well as private) are rapidly pushing us towards a feudal social pattern which is the very antithesis of democracy.

That’s Catherine Bauer, writing to Architectural Forum in 1946. This week, Places Journal republished a 1957 essay she wrote, examining what stopped the U.S. Housing Act of 1937 from gaining solid support—and it’s worth a read today: “The Dreary Deadlock of Public Housing.”


What We’re Reading

How the East and West differ on whom to spare in a self-driving car accident (Quartz)

Stockholm says no to Apple’s “town square” (The Guardian)

The shadow workforce delivering Amazon packages that won’t get a raise today (Bloomberg)

Mounting climate worries push “location, location, location” off the beach (Wall Street Journal)

Democrats can get close to a House majority with suburban seats alone (FiveThirtyEight)


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