Also: Amazon’s HQ2 search was about specialized talent, and New York’s small businesses hope for a lifeline.

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***

What We’re Following

Throughlines: Watching Border Patrol agents fire tear gas at San Diego-Tijuana border crossings this Thanksgiving might have felt like the Trump administration crossing another line in pursuing its aggressive immigration policies. But militarization at the U.S.-Mexico border has parallels to intensifying police militarization in U.S. cities over the past three to four decades. As the border security apparatus has grown, so have local police departments with military-grade weapons and surveillance tools.

Some scholars argue that America’s urban areas have long been “borderlands,” where police patrol established color lines in cities. “We’re seeing the failed policies of the War on Drugs played out in an immigration context,” says one sociologist. “These are things that have already been playing out for black and Latinx families under mass incarceration policies.”

Today on CityLab, Tanvi Misra reports: What Border Violence and Urban Policing Have in Common

Attention New York readers: Next Thursday we’re co-hosting “Housing Tomorrow’s City,” an event at the Museum of the City of New York that will explore five proposals on how to reframe housing in the wake of the affordability crisis. CityLab’s Kriston Capps will moderate the discussion. Get your tickets here.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Amazon’s HQ2 Search Was About Specialized Talent

Amazon chose Long Island City and Crystal City based on talent. But talent isn’t generic: The search for HQ2 was about particular types of it.

Richard Florida

New York’s Small Businesses See a Glimmer of Hope Against Rising Rents

Leaders at the city and state levels say they’re prepared to address the closure of mom-and-pop shops, but some key hurdles may stand in the way.

Karen Loew

Experience the Joy and Pain of Chicago Transit, in a Card Game

LOOP is both a card game and a tribute to the city’s famous L trains.

Claire Tran

America’s Epidemic of Empty Churches

Between 6,000 and 10,000 churches die in the U.S. every year, and many are sitting on prime real estate.

Jonathan Merritt

Parents, Have You Lived Without a Car? Tell Us Your Stories.

We want to hear about getting around car-free in your city.

CityLab


What’s in a Home

Elisabeth Grambrell looks over a fence at her home in Gerlach, Nevada. (Katy Grannan / The California Sunday Magazine)

From tent cities to wildfires, the West has been grappling this year with what it means to feel at home. This week, the first all-photography issue of California Sunday explores that sense of place. The magazine sent photographers across the region to ask people where they feel most at home. Accompanied by audio interviews, people share their experiences living in homes that range from chateau-like houses to trailer communes. While city dwellers in Seattle and Los Angeles pack into small apartments, we also get a more abstract sense of home with the wide open spaces of Alaska, Utah, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, and New Mexico.

The whole issue is pretty remarkable, with stories about border commuters, rent strikers, and roommate auditions. There are also stories with gripping photos from places we’ve covered in the West before such as the gentrification fights in Boyle Heights or the memory town in Chula Vista.


What We’re Reading

Airbnb will start designing houses in 2019 (Fast Company)

Needle exchanges help combat the opioid crisis. But officials keep shutting them down (Vox)

New York City wants to end its classist e-bike policy (Vice)

Send a Brutalist holiday card to the concrete lover in your life (Curbed)


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