Also: Why is it legal for landlords to refuse Section 8 renters? And the case for teaching architecture in school.

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What We’re Following

Night moves: If you’ve heard of “night mayors,” you might imagine a dream job that finally puts your “work hard, play hard” mantra to good use. But it’s not the party you think it is. For one thing, you’re nothing like an actual mayor—hence the preference for toned-down titles like “director of the office of nightlife.” The gig is decidedly bureaucratic, dealing with noise complaints, business licensing, congested corridors, parking challenges, rats… the list goes on. But as more U.S. cities are seeing value in that kind of job, we wanted to know: What, exactly, does it take to be a successful liaison between nightlife and city hall?

“What the night mayor does is actually city planning after dark,” says Mirik Milan, Amsterdam’s former night mayor, and the world’s first. But ultimately, the job’s key qualification is being a good listener, and understanding how to help the community and its regulators speak the same language. CityLab’s Linda Poon spoke with several nightlife officials around the U.S. about what it means to oversee a city after dark. Read her story: So You Want to Be a Night Mayor?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Why Is It Legal for Landlords to Refuse Section 8 Renters?

San Jose and Baltimore are considering bills to prevent landlords from rejecting tenants based on whether they are receiving federal housing aid. Why is that necessary?

Kriston Capps

How Urban Core Amenities Drive Gentrification and Increase Inequality

A new study finds that as the rich move back to superstar cities' urban cores to gain access to unique amenities they drive low-income people out.

Richard Florida

Norway’s Energy-Positive Building Spree Is Here

Oslo’s Powerhouse collective wants buildings that make better cities in the face of climate change.

Tracey Lindeman

Reading Between The Lines of Montreal’s ‘Cheap’ Rents

Compared to Toronto and Vancouver, Montreal’s real estate market looks enviable—but its rents are shaped by factors other cities can’t replicate.

Emma Jacobs

The Case for Architecture Classes in Schools

Through the organization Architecture for Children, Hong Kong architect Vicky Chan has taught urban design and planning to thousands of kids. Here’s why.

Mary Hui


Más Transit

In Monday’s edition, we asked readers to weigh in on the quality of their cities’ tacos and transit, based on what started as a silly idea on Twitter—and, well, you delivered. With more than 1,000 responses, CityLab’s David Montgomery graphed how CityLab readers feel about these two critical metrics of a strong city. The results for cities that received more than 10 votes are shown above. Who knew people felt so good about their cities’ tacos? Transit… well, that’s another story.


What We’re Reading

The Amazon invasion of New York and Virginia will be slow (Wall Street Journal)

Dr. Elon & Mr. Musk: inside Tesla’s production hell (Wired)

The criminal justice reform bill is both historic and disappointing (New Republic)

HUD took over a town’s housing authority 22 years ago. Now the authority’s broke and residents are being pushed out. (ProPublica)


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