Also: Inside the strongest clean energy requirement in the U.S., and a historical trove of “persuasive maps.”

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***

What We’re Following

For all the benefits that electric vehicles have to offer, getting drivers to make the switch hasn’t been easy. A federal incentive program in the U.S. has helped Tesla, GM, and Nissan make EVs more than a novelty by offering a $7,500 tax credit. But that incentive is scheduled to start winding down next month, and it’s an open question as to whether the EV market can continue to grow without it.

A similar scene is playing out in Norway, with a twist. The country boasts the world’s largest per-capita market for electric vehicles, thanks to generous incentives to EV buyers and deterrents to using gas and diesel cars. But the program’s success—and Oslo’s push to do away with cars entirely—raises questions about how much longer it can last. Today on CityLab, Tracey Lindeman asks: “What happens when an EV incentive program is so successful that it accomplishes its goal?”

Read her story: Norway’s EV Incentives Have Worked. Now What?

Adam Sneed


More on CityLab

Inside the Bill That Set the ‘Strongest Clean Energy Requirement in the Nation’

Washington, D.C. is on track to set a more ambitious timeline for fighting climate change than any state.

Nicole Javorsky

Why Cities Have High Hopes for Their Splashy New Parks

Private funding and high-impact design were recurring themes of parks that opened in 2018. So was the hope that parks can unite, repair, and invigorate cities.

CityLab Staff

These ‘Persuasive Maps’ Want You to Believe

A digital collection from Cornell University shows how subjective maps can be used to manipulate, rather than present the world as it really is.

Mimi Kirk

CityLab University: The Who’s Who of Urbanism

15 people who changed how we plan, design, think about, and live in cities.

Benjamin Schneider

Who Maps the World?

Too often, men. And money. But a team of OpenStreetMap users is working to draw new cartographic lines, making maps that more accurately—and equitably—reflect our space.

Sarah Holder


What We’re Reading

A Mississippi town’s first grocery store in decades highlights statewide food insecurity (Mississippi Today)

Ofo’s fall from grace is a warning to China’s tech investors (South China Morning Post)

Why New York City goes easy on its worst landlords (New York Times)

Alternative schools bear the brunt of student deaths in Chicago (Chicago Reporter)

More than 4 million children endured lockdowns last school year (Washington Post)


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