Also: Roads are getting more dangerous for pedestrians, and the 2020 census is still in big trouble.

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***

What We’re Following

Going nowhere: It’s day 32 of the partial federal government shutdown, and there’s no end in sight even as the Senate votes Thursday on two dueling proposals to end the shutdown. One, backed by Republicans, includes President Trump’s request for a border wall; the other, backed by Democrats, joins the House of Representatives bill that would reopen the government without the wall. Both are expected to fail.

As we’ve said before, the situation is becoming increasingly urgent for mayors, who are convening in Washington this week, with the shutdown’s consequences leading their agenda. “Obviously, we’ll continue to express … the urgency of the moment, ‘the fierce urgency of now,’ to quote Dr. King,” said Steve Benjamin, the mayor of Columbia, South Carolina, and the president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. “We are dealing with some incredibly delicate, sensitive financial issues for some of these families; and making sure that we’re being principled and pragmatic in helping find the solution to the shutdown.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is scheduled to address the gathering of more than 250 bipartisan mayors later today. CityLab’s Sarah Holder is reporting from the conference; stay tuned for more.

A photo of the U.S. Capitol at sunset.
Day 32. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)

Others aren’t waiting for Congress to mitigate the effects of a prolonged shutdown. Here are some updates:

  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms tells Sarah that her city is looking to create a loan program to support federal workers, “beginning with TSA agents.” San Jose, California, is already doing something similar.
  • The D.C. Council unanimously passed an emergency bill that would shield the District’s 80,000 furloughed federal workers from evictions or foreclosures, right as they are slated to miss a second paycheck on Friday. (DCist)

  • Some furloughed employees have taken up side gigs like driving for Uber, but the ride-hailing company’s CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC that the shutdown is not how he would like to recruit new drivers.

  • Americans across the country—from a farmer’s market in Greensboro, North Carolina, to a relief agency in Philadelphia—are helping feed federal workers. (WaPo)

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

American Roads Are Getting More Dangerous for Pedestrians

In the U.S., pedestrian fatalities have climbed 35 percent since 2008. And federal traffic safety regulators aren’t at work, thanks to the government shutdown.

Laura Bliss

The 2020 Census Is Still in Big Trouble

The Supreme Court may decide the fate of the citizenship question that the Trump administration wants to add to the census, and cities are bracing for chaos.

Kriston Capps

London’s Next Concert Hall Design Looks Crazy, But the Design Has a Purpose

The new music center could, regardless of its aesthetics, help to make the Barbican’s fortress walls feel more bridgeable.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Your Wedding Is Now a Chance to Crowdfund Your First Home

In lieu of traditional wedding gifts, couples are asking friends and family to chip in money toward the down payment on a new house.

Allie Volpe

In ‘Airports of the Future,’ Everything New is Old Again

Just because an amenity-filled terminal looks impressive doesn’t mean it functions well.

Janet Bednarek


What We’re Reading

The NYPD will soon deploy drones over New York City (Slate)

Imagining a past future in Oakland, California (Places Journal)

Pete Buttigieg, mayor of South Bend, Indiana, joins Democratic 2020 race (New York Times)

A wall would divide this Native American tribe’s land that straddles the U.S.-Mexico border (NPR)

Uber is challenging Lyft over its bikeshare turf in San Francisco (San Francisco Examiner)


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