Albert Gea/Reuters

Also: The cities with the most singles, and the opioid crisis’s rural-urban divide.

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***

What We’re Following

Cancel order: Breaking things off on Valentine’s Day is a move. Amazon just announced that it will not build its HQ2 campus in New York City after all. The online retailer said in a statement that opposition from state and local politicians, who criticized the nearly $3 billion in incentives promised for the project, “made it clear” that they could not “build the type of relationships that are required to go forward” on the campus in Long Island City, Queens. The company also said it does not have plans to reopen its HQ2 search, and will focus only on its other planned locations in Northern Virginia and Nashville.

That may be wise: Already, legislators in New York and beyond are doubling down on plans to make future deals like Amazon’s more difficult to broker again. On Tuesday, New York State Senator Julia Salazar and New York State Assemblymember Ron Kim pitched a plan to stand together with other states against the practice of competing for corporations with tax incentives. They also introduced legislation that would ban New York state from any future such tax giveaways. A spokesperson from Salazar’s office tells CityLab’s Sarah Holder, “We’re glad that it looks like our efforts as a movement were successful, but we’re ready to keep fighting if something changes.” Look for her story later today on CityLab.

Andrew Small and Sarah Holder


More on CityLab

The Cities With the Most Singles

Where you live can have a big impact on your Valentine’s Day by changing the odds of meeting potential mates.

Richard Florida

The Swinging Singles Bar That Changed Toronto’s Nightlife

After the fern bar craze had swept the U.S., the Coal Bin arrived in the growing, but still-conservative Canadian city.

Chris Bateman

There’s a Rural-Urban Divide in the Opiate Crisis

As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.

Tanvi Misra

Aboard Jerusalem’s Light Rail, a Divided City Rides Together

Part cultural tour, part social activism, a project called Dissolving Boundaries uses public transportation as a stage for examining relations between Israeli and Palestinian residents.

Keshia Naurana Badalge

How Urban Agriculture Can Improve Food Security

U.S. cities could learn a thing or two from Cuba and Argentina when it comes to urban farming.

Miguel Altieri


Hearts in San Francisco

If you’re looking for love this Valentine’s Day you might do well to go to San Francisco. According to data from the online dating site OkCupid, residents of the Bay Area may be among the most romantic in the country, based on answers to profile questions in nine major American cities. San Francisco-area users were most likely to call themselves romantics or to embrace stereotypically romantic activities like long walks on the beach.

Austin, Denver, and Los Angeles aren’t far behind on romance, either. By contrast, Washington, D.C., appears to have a different idea of how these things work: This chart of OkCupid users shows Washingtonians were far less likely to find hopeless, unrequited love to be “romantic.” (Just to humor the District, maybe try asking how they feel about long walks on the swamp.) CityLab data reporter David Montgomery gets to the heart of the story: Which Cities Are for Lovers? Here’s the Data

Bonus: Valentines for Urban Planning Nerds


What We’re Reading

When Baltimore said “I love you” with potholes on Valentine’s Day (Baltimore Sun)

Amazon is taking over suburbia (Quartz)

Highway infrastructure isn’t “crumbling,” actually—it’s just congested (Streetsblog)

Chicago introduces a bird-friendly building ordinance (Next City)

In the year after Parkland, there was nearly one mass shooting a day (Vox)


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