Also: Black cities ain’t going nowhere, and the powerhouses driving the world economy.

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What We’re Following

Barks and rec: When it’s completed, the dog park nestled inside Chicago’s Lincoln Yards mega-development could be the toniest pet playground in the nation. With its flashy rendering, the design idea puts a whole new spin on letting a place go to the dogs. “My first visual reaction is: That is a lot of white people with dogs,” said the editor of Chicago Architect. The fancy doggo park is actually one of the least divisive features of the project, but it serves as a small marker of a larger disparity: Almost all of Chicago’s dog parks fall in areas that are majority-white, as shown below.

Back in the day, a dog park wasn’t an amenity one might expect in a neighborhood. Now these off-leash spaces are among the fastest-growing parks in America’s cities. But as parks and recreation departments face growing demand for dog parks, often at the expense of other amenities such as playgrounds for kids, it means asking big questions about public space and inclusion that don’t get any smaller when the parcels do. Today on CityLab, Kriston Capps asks: Are Dog Parks Exclusionary?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Las Vegas Gambles on a 'Smart City' Technology Makeover

The casino mecca is piloting countless new technologies in public spaces in a bid to boost its smart-city brand. Worrying about the risks will come later.  

Laura Bliss

Black Cities Ain’t Going Nowhere

A new Brookings Institution report shows how black migration patterns have been reshaping the urban landscape, particularly in the South.

Brentin Mock

The Real Powerhouses That Drive the World’s Economy

It’s not nation states or even cities, but mega-regions—combinations of multiple metro areas—that are the real forces powering the global economy.

Richard Florida

Berlin Will Spend €2 Billion Per Year to Improve Public Transit

The German capital plans to make major investments to expand bus and rail networks, boost frequency, and get ahead of population growth. Are you jealous yet?

Feargus O'Sullivan

Portland Promises a ‘Green’ Highway Expansion. It’s Not.

Here’s why Oregon officials claim that widening Interstate 5 will actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Henry Grabar


What We’re Reading

When does a crash become a crime? (Texas Monthly)

America’s cities are running on software from the 1980s (Bloomberg)

How big tech is automating the climate crisis (Gizmodo)

More pedestrians and cyclists died in 2016 than in any of the past 25 years (Washington Post)


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