Also: The curious politics of a mega-mall, and a red-state YIMBY bill.

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What We’re Following

Urban fabric: America’s cities and metropolitan areas don’t look like they used to. Since the turn of the century, the back-to-the-city movement has changed the demographic and development patterns in metro areas, and the old model of urban/suburban or poor city/rich suburb have largely broken down. As a result, according to a new study in Urban Science, the lines that have traditionally divided cities by race and class have blurred.

Neighborhood fragmentation of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa in 2010. (Source: Urban Science, Creative Commons license)

Race and class still underpin a stark divide between the most affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black neighborhoods, which haven’t changed as much as other types of neighborhoods. The suburbs, meanwhile, are in the midst of a dramatic change that’s making them more diverse, and more like the old model of the inner city. Today on CityLab, Richard Florida takes a look at how urban neighborhoods, once distinct by race and class, are blurring.

This just in: The Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that constitutional protections against excessive fines apply to civil asset forfeiture, a controversial seizure tool that has brought revenue to local police departments. We’ll have more on what the case means for cities soon.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A Red-State Take on a YIMBY Housing Bill

Utah’s SB 34, aimed at increasing the state’s supply of affordable housing, may hold lessons for booming cities of the Mountain West, and beyond.

Nolan Gray and Brandon Fuller

The Curious Politics of a Montreal Mega-Mall

The car-dependent suburb it’ll be built in wants to greenlight Royalmount against the city government’s wishes but it needs them to pay for the public infrastructure.

Tracey Lindeman

There’s a Tile Theft Epidemic in Lisbon

With a single azulejo fetching hundreds of euros at the city’s more reputable antique stores, these tiles, sitting there out in the open, are easy pickings.

Jenny Barchfield

New Oil Drilling Could Be Coming to the Everglades

A Florida appeals court has approved exploratory oil drilling in the Everglades, prompting worries about Miami’s water supply and risks to the wetland ecosystem.

Rebecca Renner

Cape Town Is Food-Rich, so Why Are Some Residents Food Insecure?

Cape Town in South Africa is a foodie destination. Some people in its renowned restaurant industry are trying to spread the food wealth citywide.

Serena Hawkey


What We’re Reading

Baltimore is so segregated, even Strava shows it (Runner’s World)

The Trump administration is trying to claw back California’s high-speed rail money (Politico)

After New York’s war with Amazon, Uber could be next (New York Times)

Watch the Today show interview newly elected Mayor Bernie Sanders in 1981 (Vox)

Amtrak wants to serve cities more, so it’s looking at cutting long-haul routes (Wall Street Journal)


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