Also: The case against the Obama Presidential Center, and Berlin’s ideas for a housing revolution.

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What We’re Following

Help wanted: What happens when workers and job openings are too far apart? Many U.S. cities are finding that out right now, experiencing a mismatch between job postings and job seekers, according to a new report from the Urban Institute. The imbalance is most pronounced in the Bay Area, where jobs cluster in the more affluent parts of the region, putting large distances between work and home for lower-wage workers.

The same mismatch exists in Boston, Minneapolis, Chicago, and New York. Other cities—like Columbus and Atlanta—suffer in the other direction, where areas have more job seekers than job postings. But it doesn’t have to be this way, researchers say: There are things local governments and companies can do to help address this problem. Today on CityLab, Laura Bliss reports: In Many U.S. Cities, There’s a Big Mismatch Between Jobs and Workers

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A City of Renters Asks: Can We Ban Landlords Who Own Too Much?

Berliners are building an arsenal of ideas to stage a housing revolution, and many are winning public support.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

Kriston Capps

Where Women Startup Founders Are Gaining Ground

The share of VC-backed startups with women founders has grown dramatically, but Silicon Valley lags behind other hubs.

Richard Florida and Nicole Javorsky

The Playbook Behind Miami Marine Stadium’s Comeback

Since 2012, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has shined “a spotlight on the stadium so brightly that saving it seems like the only option.”

Jason Clement

A History of the American Public Library

A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

Ariel Aberg-Riger


Ain’t Got That Swing

The idea that America’s suburbs are the home of moderate swing voters isn’t quite right. A new poll suggests that only 15 percent of suburban voters identified as independents, lower than the rate for rural or urban residents, as shown above. What does make the suburbs politically distinct is a more even split between Democrats and Republicans than in cities or rural areas. Still, place can have a lasting impact on political persuasions: The survey found that Americans who moved from cities into the ’burbs voted much more like their former urban neighbors than their new suburban ones. CityLab data reporter David Montgomery has the story: Why Suburban Swing Voters May Be Less Common Than You Think


What We’re Reading

New York subpoenas Airbnb for home-sharing data (Next City)

After China’s import ban, cities are burning their recyclables (The Guardian)

Miami and Milwaukee are in for a lobbying fight on who hosts the 2020 DNC (Politico)

The complex story of Hulan Jack, the first black “Boss of Manhattan” (New York Times)


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