Also: Where housing costs devour budgets, and a sweeping Airbnb ban in Madrid.

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What We’re Following

Won’t you be my neighbor? A lot happens when a neighborhood gentrifies. Existing residents may see some positive effects—affluent neighbors tending to bring safer streets or improved schools—and newcomers might even pick a place based on the potential for the kind of community they seek. But the sense of community in these neighborhoods can suffer as a result of these changes. That’s a key finding from a new paper on Philadelphia’s gentrifying neighborhoods, where residents reported a lessened sense of trust and belonging compared to people in neighborhoods that weren’t gentrifying.

While gentrification may not cause direct displacement, it foreshadows a slower demographic turnover that can cause fear, alienation, and other tensions that erode community ties. “These neighborhoods may be, in a demographic sense, integrating, but socially they’re not integrating,” one researcher tells CityLab’s Tanvi Misra. Read her story: What Happens to Community Bonds When a Neighborhood Gentrifies

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Neighborhoods Where Housing Costs Devour Budgets

A significant chunk of Americans spend more than half their incomes on rent or home mortgage payments. Here’s data on the severely housing-burdened.

David Montgomery

Madrid Bans Airbnb Apartments That Don’t Have Private Entrances

A new vacation rental law aims to ease the strain of tourism in central Madrid and spread the industry’s benefits to other parts of the city.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Can This Arts Center Make Hudson Yards Likeable?

If The Shed remains committed to its lofty goals, Hudson Yards may soon provide real accessibility and a sorely needed sense of inclusion.

Laura Feinstein

A Restored Norfolk Theater Is Back in the Spotlight

After years of vacancy, name changes, and collapsing ceilings, the Attucks still holds a special place in the collective memory of Norfolk’s black community.

Nicholas Som

The Troubling Limits of the ‘Great Crime Decline’

The fall of urban violence since the 1990s was a public health breakthrough, as NYU sociologist Patrick Sharkey says in his book Uneasy Peace. But we must go further.

Mark Obbie


What We’re Reading

The streets were never free. Congestion pricing makes that plain. (New York Times)

1 in 3 high-speed chases at the border ended in a crash (ProPublica)

Will Amazon HQ2’s effect on Northern Virginia’s housing be as feared—or hoped for? (Washington Post)

Stickering is an increasingly popular art form for D.C. artists, particularly women (Washington Post)


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