Also: The many lives of Notre-Dame, and designing a human habitat on the moon.

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What We’re Following

HUD’s rule change: The Trump administration has a new front in its anti-immigration campaign: public housing. This week, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development proposed a new rule to restrict housing assistance for families with mixed-citizenship status. The administration claims the rule would eject some 32,000 families from federal housing and cut down on waitlists for public assistance. Housing advocates say it wouldn’t make a dent in the millions of people waiting for public housing collectively across the country.

Currently, HUD allows families to live together in subsidized housing even if one member is ineligible because of their immigration status; the agency pro-rates the subsidy to exclude those people from federal support. The proposed change would prevent an entire family from living in subsidized housing if even one undocumented family member lives with them. “So essentially, what HUD is saying is that, say, the mom is undocumented, but she’s got five kids who are citizens, then this is going to make those kids homeless,” says one tenant protection attorney. CityLab’s Tanvi Misra and Kriston Capps have the story: Why HUD wants to Restrict Housing Assistance for Immigrants

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Many Lives of Notre-Dame

Far from being a single author’s definitive text, the beloved cathedral’s history is a palimpsest.

Darran Anderson

Designing the First Full-Time Human Habitat on the Moon

“We’re right at the cusp, technologically speaking, to be able to do this for the first time.”

Nicole Javorsky

In a Border Detention Center, Art Helps Migrant Kids Remember Home

A new exhibit in El Paso showcases works of art created by children detained in a massive border encampment of migrants in Tornillo, Texas.

Tanvi Misra

Will Ottawa Ever Get Its Light Rail?

Sinkholes, winter-weary trains, and political upheaval have held the Confederation Line light-rail transit back from a seriously overdue opening.

Tracey Lindeman

New York City Passes Sweeping Climate Legislation

The Climate Mobilization Act lays the groundwork for New York City’s own Green New Deal.

Alexander C. Kaufman


Scoot alors!

(NACTO)

The number of trips taken on shared bikes and scooters in the United States more than doubled in 2018 from the year before, with 84 million trips total, according the graphic above from the National Association of City Transportation Officials. Electric scooters rolled into many cities last year and accounted for 38.5 million trips (shown in orange). In one year, they surpassed the number of trips taken by regular station-based bikeshare (36.5 million trips, shown in green). It’s a triumph for micromobility, but CityLab’s Laura Bliss writes that “a single year’s worth of trip data doesn’t amount to a full picture of the U.S. transportation landscape.” We still have to wait and see if scooters can make the overwhelming number of solo car commuters budge at all. Read Laura’s take: Electric Scooters Aren’t a Transportation Revolution Yet


What We’re Reading

America’s record high energy consumption, explained (Vox)

Could portable benefits help gig workers find stability? (Next City)

Living on the wrong side of a time zone can be hazardous to your health (Washington Post)

The bees living on Notre Dame’s roof survived the fire (CNN)

Quiz: Can you guess the city from the vintage travel poster? (The Guardian)


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