Also: D.C.’s go-go- showdown, and cemeteries become art galleries.

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What We’re Following

Hub cap: From the Bay Area and Seattle to the Boston-New York-D.C. corridor, America’s leading tech hubs have become increasingly expensive, unaffordable, and mired in a kind of tech backlash. This has fed speculation that tech companies might distribute their very mobile jobs across cheaper, up-and-coming tech ecosystems like Pittsburgh, Nashville, and Miami.

But the latest data from Indeed, the job listings website, finds that established tech hubs continue to dominate. Eight leading regions account for about a third of all high-tech job postings, a share that increased from 2017 to 2018. In fact, Silicon Valley still makes up a quarter of the site’s high-tech job postings, followed by the D.C. metro region, which is poised to see an influx of tech workers with the arrival of Amazon’s HQ2. Today on CityLab, Richard Florida considers if the tech sector is reaching an inflection point where emerging smaller hubs might see the market break their way: America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How Historic Ellicott City Plans to Survive the Next Flood

After catastrophic storms in 2016 and 2018, the Maryland mill town has five flood control plans. But it faces hard choices on how to avoid future disasters.

Linda Poon

What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

Tanvi Misra

Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

Mark Byrnes

Segregation Is Preventable. Congress Just Isn’t Trying.

Again and again, federal efforts to promote integration have been whittled down almost to nothing.

Richard D. Kahlenberg, Halley Potter, and Kimberly Quick

Civic Crowdfunding Can Reduce the Risk of ‘Bikelash’

This collective fundraising technique can help defuse anti-cyclist sentiment before it dooms protected bike lanes and other new infrastructure.

Kate Gasparro


Avant Garden

Ruth Stanford's "From the Ground Up" installation in the 2018 'Golden Hour' exhibition at Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta. (Courtesy of Oakland Cemetery)

Here’s a place you may not expect to find art: the cemetery. These sprawling spaces were once common places for art in many early American cities, before they established parks and museums. Now, as historic burial grounds run out of space and have fewer visitors to older graves, their custodians hope to revive this tradition. Through artists-in-residence programs, cinema series, nighttime performances, and more modern memorials, these spaces hope to change their relationship to the living, and to the communities around them. Today on CityLab: Why Old American Cemeteries Are Showcasing New Art


What We’re Reading

The bus of the future is coming at 11 miles per hour (Curbed)

More affluent neighborhoods are creating their own school districts (Vox)

How much slower would the U.S. grow without immigration? In many places, a lot (New York Times)

Two artists built a 32-acre queer playground in middle America (W Magazine)


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