Also: L.A.’s one-stop shop for backyard homes, and what if air conditioning could help stop climate change?

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What We’re Following

Brussels route: It’s quiet and calm in Brussels, and that’s no accident. Cars were already absent from the wriggling little narrow streets that wind through the city’s center, but now the city has been transforming its broad boulevards into pedestrian zones, too, making permanent spaces for people, trees, and bikes in places that were once busy crossroads. The congested capital city of Belgium is nearing completion of one of the most ambitious pro-pedestrian makeovers seen this century, on a scale rivaled only by Madrid.

CityLab’s Feargus O’Sullivan writes today that the plan could well make Brussels the international role model it deserves to be. Read Feargus’s latest story: In Car-Choked Brussels, the Pedestrians are Winning.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A One-Stop Shop for Affordable Backyard Homes Advances in L.A.

A new program in Los Angeles seeks to finance and build accessory dwellings for homeowners who agree to rent them to Section 8 voucher-holders.

Zach Mortice

What If Air Conditioning Could Help Stop Climate Change Instead of Causing It?

Using technology currently in development, AC units in skyscrapers and homes could get turned into machines that pull carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.

Matt Simon

Mayor Buttigieg Is Working Remotely Today

The 2020 presidential contender is meeting powerful donors and charming the coastal media. But what about his day job back in South Bend?

Edward-Isaac Dovere

What the Mutual Admiration Among Jews and Muslims in the U.S. Reveals

A Muslim-American former state department officer analyzes a new poll and finds fertile ground for officials to engage faith groups before tragedy strikes.

Usra Ghazi

The Tax Break That Could Fund New Charter Schools

The charter school movement is eyeing the tax incentives in the federal Opportunity Zone program to help fund new school construction.

Rachel M. Cohen


What We’re Reading

The fight for the right to drive (New Yorker)

Why America hasn’t elected a mayor as president in almost 100 years (Slate)

The newest coworking space is a parking spot (Fast Company)

San Francisco could be the first U.S. city to ban facial recognition tech (Engadget)

Podcast: How squirrels came to live in cities (99 Percent Invisible)


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