Also: The woman who invented the modern kitchen, and long school commutes are terrible for kids.

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***

What We’re Following

Pickup line: The apps are off today as Uber and Lyft drivers hit the picket line in San Francisco, Chicago, New York, London, and other cities. In anticipation of Uber’s public filing at the end of this week, where the company is seeking a $100 billion valuation, drivers want to shift attention to their pay and work conditions. One estimate from the Economic Policy Institute last year found that after accounting for costs like vehicle expenses and health insurance, Uber drivers earn about $9.21 in hourly wages.  

Today’s protest will see drivers rallying at city halls and airports to make their voices heard. But the drivers are toeing a fine line, knowing riders may be sensitive to the shutoff and that different local demands may require careful rhetoric. “We want to put the pressure on, but not to make so much of a stink that everyone hates us,” one Chicago organizer tells CityLab’s Sarah Holder. Today on CityLab: Why Uber and Lyft Drivers Are Striking

Updates: We previously reported on campaigns in Denver to decriminalize “magic mushrooms” and to let homeless people camp in public spaces. Voters appear to have rejected both initiatives (Colorado Springs Gazette).

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Long School Commutes Are Terrible for Kids

Children who live farther away from their schools get significantly less sleep and exercise, new research shows.

Richard Florida

The Woman Who Invented the Modern Kitchen

There are “dream kitchens,” and then there’s the Frankfurt Kitchen, designed by architect Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky in 1926.

Sarah Archer

Why Miami Beach Spent Big on Public Art

The city spent an unprecedented $7 million on a mural, sculptures, and other artworks around its newly renovated convention center.

Yael Friedman

Instead of a Border Wall, Why Not a ‘Clean Energy Corridor’?

Building solar panels and wind turbines along the U.S.-Mexico border, say scientists, could unite demands for a Green New Deal and stronger border security.

Amal Ahmed

What a Landmark Scooter Safety Study Says About Head Injuries

A CDC report on the safety of dockless electric scooters in Austin, Texas, makes a strong case for wearing a helmet—and improving infrastructure.

Sarah Holder


Help Haunted

Bodie, California (Carol Highsmith/Library of Congress)

In 1962, California purchased the land that makes up the town of Bodie, one of the most dangerous towns during the 19th century Gold Rush. Today, it’s filled with about 100 wooden buildings in the middle of the nowhere, and kept in a state of “arrested decay.” Operating now as a historical park, the town draws in about 1,000 visitors a day and requires a year-round staff. But during the cold, unplowed winters, the staff shrinks down to a five-person skeleton crew. And to be an off-season caretaker of Bodie, you need a high tolerance for cold, solitude, and two-hour grocery runs. Today on CityLab: What It’s Like to Live in a California Ghost Town


What We’re Reading

A Georgia mayor said her city isn’t ready for a black leader. A councilmember went further (Washington Post)

More than 1,000 families are still searching for homes six months after the Camp Fire (NPR)

How Pete Buttigieg became the new toast of Silicon Valley’s wealthiest donors (Vox)

Bird has a new scooter you can own... for $1,299 (The Verge)

Immigration arrests and the abandoned vans of Atlanta (New York Times)


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