Also: Infrastructure Week isn’t a joke anymore, and the geography of brain drain in America.

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What We’re Following

Where’s your head at: When shared scooters descended on American city streets, we heard plenty of stories of rides gone wrong. Without data, though, it’s been hard to tell how many riders were really getting injured, or what safety lessons might follow. Now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is offering a glimpse of how riders are getting hurt—and this much-awaited study comes with one piece of obvious advice: Wear a helmet.

Of the 271 riders identified identified for potential injuries, about 45 percent involved some form of head injury. Less than 1 percent of riders were wearing a helmet. While that may be the most striking finding (sparking the classic helmet debate), other safety factors are at play, too, including poor road conditions and inexperienced first-time riders. That could suggest the landscape of scooter injuries will change as more people get familiar with them. Today on CityLab, Sarah Holder reports: Scooters Wouldn’t Be So Dangerous If You Just Wore a Helmet

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Infrastructure Week Isn’t a Joke Anymore

A deal with the Democrats may now be Trump’s best chance for a legislative win ahead of 2020.

Elaina Plott

The Uber-Transit Convergence Arrives in Denver

The ride-hailing giant once called public transportation a threat to its growth. But in one city, it’s joining forces.

Laura Bliss

The Geography of Brain Drain in America

Across the United States, there are fewer states gaining brainpower than draining it, according to a new report from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee.

Richard Florida

Inside Mexico City’s Street Market for Cults

The Sonora Market is the commercial ground zero for religious fashions, from Santeria to medicinal herbs to ritual cleansings to statues of Santa Muerte.

Feike de Jong and Gustavo Graf

The Architecture Behind Columbia's Manhattanville Ambitions

A new campus has a mandate to better connect the institution to the world, but its presence has left neighbors asking, “What about us?”

James S. Russell


Grab a Tissue

(Kurt Treeby)

Here’s a potential craft idea for anyone who has cried out for historic preservation in vain: a tissue-box replica of a demolished building. Buffalo-based artist Kurt Treeby has been making mini-recreations of razed or altered architectural wonders, using tissues to add an extra layer of meaning through their association with mourning. Inspired by his fascination with Buffalo’s decision to raze a Frank Lloyd Wright office building in the 1950s, Treeby has created yarn imitations of demolished buildings, from Paul Rudolph’s Shoreline Apartments to Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum to the postmodern Best store shown above. CityLab’s Mark Byrnes spoke with Treeby to get the yarn about how these boxes came to be. Read: A Tissue for Your Favorite Demolished Building


What We’re Reading

Manufacturing can’t create enough jobs. Infrastructure can. (New York Times)

Uber is going public. What better time to talk about climate change? (The Verge)

When Beverly Hills is worried about gentrification, it’s time to define the term (Slate)

Renewables just generated more electricity than coal for the first time in the U.S. (Quartz)

Can an art collective become the Disney of the experience economy? (New York Times)


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