Also: The world’s largest co-housing building, and Uber Copter will only make things worse.

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What We’re Following

One nation, undercount: The 2020 Census is approaching fast, and the risk of an undercount is high. The salient questions now are how large the undercount could be, and who will be left out. Based on demographic changes, new census-taking technology, and the possible effects of a citizenship question, the Urban Institute has calculated which states have the highest risk of an undercount—California, Texas, New Mexico, Nevada, Georgia, New York, and Florida—and who stands to gain in the best- and worst-case scenarios.

Such a miscount could favor whites and Republican-leaning districts at the expense of younger, lower income, and black and Hispanic residents. It could also throw key federal funding formulas out of whack. Even before the Supreme Court rules on the looming citizenship question, many states are preparing for a fight to ensure a fair and accurate count. CityLab’s Kriston Capps reports: Where a Census Undercount Will Hurt (or Help) Most

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Largest Co-Housing Building in the World Is Coming to San Jose

The co-living startup Starcity plans to build an 800-unit, 18-story “dorm for adults” to help affordably house Silicon Valley’s booming workforce.

Sarah Holder

Uber Copter Will Only Make New York Transit Worse

The ride-hailing company’s plan to offer Manhattan-to-JFK helicopter shuttles overshadows the public-transit alternative that would help many more travelers.

John Surico

What’s Next For Ontario Place, a Treasured Toronto Amusement Park

Premier Doug Ford wants to see Ontario Place redeveloped. A preservation battle over the vital piece of Canada’s postwar architectural history is looming.

Chris Bateman

The Cities Fighting Back Against State Abortion Restrictions

As more states pass restrictive abortion laws, cities are fighting back. Among the resistance: local prosecutors who say they will not enforce the laws.

Molly Keisman

How 'Maintainers,' Not 'Innovators,' Make the World Turn

We need more stories about the labor that sustains society, a group of scholars say.

Laura Bliss


Rest in Place

(Credit: Tigerman McCurry)

Stanley Tigerman, the dean of Chicago architecture, passed away this week, leaving behind a legacy that could best be described as iconoclastic. Tigerman, who died Monday at 88, is most often associated with Postmodernism, but his works ranged from the pristine international style (Chicago’s Boardwalk Apartments) to Gotham City gothic (the Chicago Bar Association building). He was a founding member of the Chicago Seven, a seminal Pomo group, as well as Archeworks, a public-interest design lab. Tigerman thrived on subversive humor—irony, playfulness, and irreverence.

His witticisms include a parking garage shaped like the front of a Rolls Royce, an Arby’s with a structuralist-expressionist touch, and a photomontage that depicted a building by Mies van der Rohe sinking like the Titanic. “It’s just a box of animal crackers,” he once told Chicago Magazine of a whimsical 1978 home that he designed in Highland Park. Tigerman’s work was cheeky, but never sacrilegious. The architect’s Jewish faith, evident in projects such as the Illinois Holocaust Museum, deeply motivated his humanist work.

Kriston Capps


What We’re Reading

Can we shrink our carbon footprint by working less? (Grist)

Big Carpet wants to end America’s love of hardwood floors (Bloomberg)

Automatic restaurants are a thing of the future and the past (99 Percent Invisible)

Urban forests are dying. Baltimore shows us how to bring them back. (Popular Science)

The NYPD apologized for its actions in the Stonewall Riot (New York Times)


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