Also: What’s in a street food fight, and how to game zoning codes to build super tall.

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***

What We’re Following

Designated drivers: When Uber throws a party, who drives the drivers? The ride-hailing company discovered this question the hard way on Monday when it invited its gig workers to a drivers’ appreciation dinner at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. The invitation promised each driver could bring three guests and that the party would include free parking. Turns out they all drove themselves, resulting in an “unplanned mess,” one would-be attendee told the Chicago Tribune.

The dinner event jammed up traffic and filled up the museum’s parking lot, and at 8:10 p.m. the company sent a text to drivers saying the event was full. Drivers took social media to vent their frustration (Block Club Chicago). It’s just one little rich episode, but it speaks to the big challenges the ride-hailing company and cities face, from keeping drivers happy to increased traffic congestion to the high cost of free parking. Maybe next time, pick a place closer to the L train?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

When Street Food Builds One Community, and Rankles Another

Berlin’s Thaipark has long represented the best of what informal food markets have to offer. So why does the city think it’s a problem?

Feargus O'Sullivan

How to Game the Zoning Codes to Build Supertall Skyscrapers

Three supertall New York City skyscrapers reveal just how creative lawyers can be in gaming the city’s zoning codes.

James S. Russell

Meet Mexico City’s Sign Painters

Seemingly replaced by vinyl-printed ads since the early 2000s, artists who can paint advertisements by hand are making a comeback.

Feike de Jong and Gustavo Graf

If Climate Goals Aren’t Met, Extreme Heat Will Kill Thousands in U.S. Cities

A new report estimates as many as 2,700 heat-related deaths can be prevented in just one city if global temperature rise can be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

Linda Poon


Get Wired

(Madison McVeigh/CityLab)

Internet access is essential for modern life, but current policies don't treat it that way. In this special bonus episode of Technopolis, hosts Jim Kapsis and Molly Turner talk to Maya Wiley about a core piece of the infrastructure for our tech future: broadband. Wiley, a digital equity expert and MSNBC contributor, breaks down the history of broadband access, the severity of the inequity, and what it costs us all when some people just can't get online. Hear the latest episode of Technopolis: Are we at risk of creating a permanent digital underclass?

Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts / Stitcher / Google Play / Spotify

Technopolis listeners! We want to hear your thoughts about this first season of the podcast. We would especially love to know if the show helps you think about how to make your town or city a better place to live, either professionally or personally. If you’ve been listening, please fill out our brief survey.


What We’re Reading

Why are some small towns thriving? (New York Times)

Beto O’Rourke touts his immigration credentials. But these El Pasoans say he doomed their historic neighborhood. (Texas Tribune)

Why Walmart parking lots are perfect for electric vehicle charging (Curbed)

How did WeWork’s Adam Neumann turn office space with “community” into a $47 billion company? Not by sharing. (New York)


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