Also: The AOC of Denver's city council, and a philanthropic boost for economic mobility.

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What We’re Following

House divided: Everyone can agree—the rent is too damned high. That’s why Democratic presidential candidates keep pitching affordable housing plans to attract voters in 2020. But when it comes to solving the problem, any hints of consensus break down. There isn't a single progressive answer to the housing affordability crisis in part because there isn't even a clear partisan divide on the issue. And as messy as the politics of housing might seem in today's crowded Democratic presidential field, just wait until the Trump administration unveils the plan it's putting together.

Mark Byrnes/CityLab/AP

What is clear is that there’s a national appeal for finding affordability solutions. For the issue to resonate at all in national politics is unusual by historical standards, and as candidates pitch the various ways they plan to address the problem, voters will have plenty of options to weigh. “Just in these first early months of the election season, we’ve already seen more attention on affordable housing policy than, I think, in entire presidential campaigns in history,” says one housing expert. CityLab’s Kriston Capps asks: Will Housing Swing the 2020 Election?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A Freeway Fight Launched Denver’s New Queer Latina Councilmember

In a progressive shake-up, 32-year-old community organizer Candi CdeBaca will take her advocacy work to the city council.  

Laura Bliss

NBA Free Agents Cluster in Superstar Cities, Too

Pro basketball follows the winner-take-all geography of America as a whole, with free agents gravitating to New York, L.A., and other big cities.

Richard Florida

In 1990s Oakland, Youth Voices Started A Movement

We Are Here, an exhibit at two museums in the Bay Area, documents candid 1990s’ conversations among Oakland youth and cops, and the activist work they ignited.

Sarah Holder

Why These Hong Kong Protests Are Different

Demonstrations in 2014 brought people like Joshua Wong to the attention of the world. These latest rallies are very different.

Timothy McLaughlin

The 10 Cities Getting a Philanthropic Boost for Economic Mobility

An initiative funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ballmer Group focuses on building “pipelines of opportunity.”

Sarah Holder


What We’re Reading

Cities start to question an American ideal: A house with a yard on every lot (New York Times)

Going “zero carbon” is all the rage. But can it stop climate change? (NPR)

How Teach for America evolved into an arm of the charter school movement (ProPublica)

When will the Mississippi River come for New Orleans? (Slate)

Landlords oppose Trump plan to evict undocumented workers (New York Times)


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