Also: When a suffering city loses its newspaper, and how “corn sweat” makes summer more humid.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

All the small things: Architecture isn’t just about big buildings. Daily life is full of small spaces that might not even register as structures that have been intentionally designed: Think subway entrances and bus stops, kiosks and gas stations, fountains and phone booths. They might not make grand design statements, but they have an underrated charm and nobility.

The fiberglass K67 kiosk (Courtesy of Museum of Architecture and Design, Ljubljana)

Unlike the architecture of the powerful, these little works of architecture often have to justify their continued existence in a commercial or functional way. To be preserved, they either have to gain iconic status or adapt to new uses. Today on CityLab, Darran Anderson writes there is “a danger of supposing” that such small structures “are unworthy of maintaining:” Why Everyday Architecture Deserves Respect

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Youngstown Loses its Newspaper, and a Lot More

The closing of The Vindicator, Youngstown’s daily paper, means that this long-suffering Ohio city won’t have the ability to shape its own narrative.

Sherry Linkon and John Russo

How ‘Corn Sweat’ Makes Summer Days More Humid

It’s a real phenomenon, and it’s making the hot weather muggier in the American Midwest.

David Montgomery

Here's What the Heat Island Looks Like in East Coast Cities

Maps of urban heat islands show where residents can find pockets of cooler air in Boston, Philadelphia, Richmond, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C.

Linda Poon

How to Make Transit More Accessible to the Visually Impaired

New signage and NaviLens technology have been rolled out in Barcelona, Madrid, and Murcia city to help visually impaired people navigate public transportation.

Aisha Majid

What Restaurant Reviews Reveal About Cities

Where official census data is sparse, MIT researchers find that restaurant review websites can offer similar demographic and economic information.

Linda Poon



What We’re Reading

How much is a view worth in Manhattan? Try $11 million (New York Times)

What Seattle learned from having the highest minimum wage in the country (Vox)

Why did Kamala Harris pick Baltimore for a campaign headquarters? (Baltimore Sun)

City planners eye self-driving cars as a chance to correct 20th century mistakes (Washington Post)

Democratic candidates criticize the business model of Uber and Lyft—and keep using them (Quartz)


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