Also: When did Spain’s high-speed rail get so good? And how Utrecht became a cycling paradise.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Vacation, all I ever wanted: Tourism campaigns have long been a way for cities to lure in outsiders by showing off what they have to offer. But what if too many people take the bait? That’s what’s happening in Vancouver this summer as the city approaches its full tourism capacity, with tour buses clogging up streets and hotels running out of rooms.

Vancouver is hardly alone here. Longstanding vacation hotspots like Venice, Amsterdam, and Barcelona have been feeling this pain for years—and they’ve even offered an instructive model for other cities. Now Vancouver and others are following their lead with a different kind of campaign, one that aims to dissuade, disperse, or delay tourists in order to keep things from getting out of control. Today on CityLab: Hit by a Tourism Boom, Cities Wonder When to Stop Self-Promotion

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

France’s Next High-Speed Trains Could Be Run by Spain

Spain’s national rail operator has quietly become a leader in Europe. Now it wants to compete with its neighbor to the north.

Feargus O'Sullivan

How Utrecht Became a Paradise for Cyclists

A new short film reveals how the Dutch city reengineered itself around the bicycle, with life- and money-saving results.

Laura Bliss

Where Gentrification Leads, School Desegregation Follows

In rapidly gentrifying areas of Queens and Brooklyn, the new population is spurring a gradual desegregation of some New York City public schools.

Kfir Mordechay and Jennifer B. Ayscue

The Last of Shanghai's Historic Shikumen Houses, in Photos

Built in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, shikumen houses are barely holding on in the modern megacity.  

Claire Tran

Despite Everything, America Remains a Nation of Hot Dogs

On the Fourth of July, Americans might not have much in common, but the power of one national symbol endures.

David Dudley



What We’re Reading

Two large earthquakes rattled Los Angeles—where was the early warning? (Curbed)

The overlooked monument that marks “America’s worst road trip” turns 100 (WAMU)

ICE used facial recognition to mine state driver’s license databases (New York Times)

Justice Department changes legal team behind the 2020 census citizenship question (NPR)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: subway in NYC
    Transportation

    Inside Bloomberg's $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

    Drawing on his time as New York City mayor, Michael Bloomberg proposes handing power and money to urban leaders as part of his Democratic presidential bid.

  2. Environment

    Neighborhoods With a History of Redlining Are Hotter on Average

    Housing discrimination during the 1930s helps explain why poorer neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

  3. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  4. photo: a couple tries out a mattress in a store.
    Equity

    What’s the Future of the ‘Sleep Economy’?

    As bed-in-a-box startup Casper files for an IPO, the buzzy mattress seller is betting that the next big thing in sleep is brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

  5. a sign advertising public parking next to a large building
    Equity

    U.S. Mayors Say Infrastructure Is a Priority. But What Kind?

    The Menino Survey of Mayors identifies priorities like infrastructure, traffic safety, and climate change. But many mayors aren’t eager to challenge the status quo.

×