Also: How freeway revolts shaped U.S. cities, and remembering an architect who shaped skylines.

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What We’re Following

Charges may apply: Since 1956, the United States has collected a federal fuel tax to contribute to the Highway Trust Fund, pairing money to help build and maintain roads with the gasoline and diesel that vehicles burn on them. But the tax has stayed flat as cars have become more fuel efficient, and the growing number of gasoline-free cars threatens to further deplete the fund, which has been running a shortfall for many years. How will the feds fund future road repairs?

California, Washington, and Illinois are each mulling a “mileage tax,” where drivers pay based on the miles they drive rather than the gas they consume. That raises a dilemma, though: Charging electric vehicle drivers a mileage fee might slow the adoption of EVs at a time when cheap gas is fueling a climate catastrophe. Does it make sense to make these drivers pay up? CityLab’s Laura Bliss reports on a new attempt to weigh the tradeoffs: Should Electric Vehicle Drivers Pay Per Mile?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Skyline-Shaping Architecture of César Pelli

The Argentine architect, who has died at age 92, created striking projects like the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur and the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco.

CityLab Staff

How Freeway Revolts Shaped U.S. Cities

Urbanites who battled the construction of the Interstate Highway System in the 1960s saved some neighborhoods—but many highways did transform cities.

Linda Poon

Reading the Story of London’s Hindus Through Temple Architecture

Ranging from adapted historic buildings to ornate cultural centers, London’s Hindu temples tell of waves of immigration to Britain and increasing visibility.

Erica X Eisen

A Small Town Decides Parking Can't Be a Bargain Anymore

Nevada City, California, used to advertise its “bargain” parking meters. Now they’re getting more expensive to protect the town against an existential threat.

Laura Bliss

The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

Kriston Capps



What We’re Reading

Nashville residents blocked ICE from arresting their neighbor (Washington Post)

Was the automotive era a terrible mistake? (New Yorker)

My frantic life as a cab-dodging, tip-chasing food app deliveryman (New York Times)

Is Chicago finally ready to reckon with its 1919 race riots? (Block Club Chicago)

Why am I scared to ride a bike? (The Nib)


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