Also: An ancient city gets a splashy new waterfront, and what affordable housing looks like in Shanghai.

What We’re Following

Get creative: Since the Great Recession, the members of what CityLab’s Richard Florida calls America’s “creative class” have flocked to just a handful of cities, chasing skill-demanding jobs in technology, education, and the arts that cluster in increasingly more expensive places. Just look at which places have the largest share of this high-talent workforce and you’ll see that the list looks much like it did in the mid-2000s. Cities like D.C., San Jose, and San Francisco lead the pack; a few other booming metros—Denver, Boston, and Seattle, for example—have shuffled places in the ranks of metro areas since then. For the most part, creative class workers concentrate in just a few cities.

But the creative class has grown in ranks, adding another 12 million workers across U.S. metro areas from 2005 to 2017. That remarkable growth has meant that places like Salt Lake City, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and Las Vegas have increased their share of knowledge workers, giving credence to the idea that more affordable cities may be gaining the talent they need to get an economic boost. Today, Florida digs into the data: Where the Creative Class Is Growing

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

In a City With Ancient Ruins, a New Waterfront Is the Star

Thessaloniki’s New Waterfront is the centerpiece in an effort to transform the local economy, and other cities are taking notice.

Kriston Capps

When Affordable Housing in Shanghai Is a Bed in the Kitchen

In this sector of the city’s informal housing rental market, as many as 24 people can be crammed into a three-bedroom apartment.

Linda Poon

On the Road, Police Power Has Few Limits

Officers have wide discretion when they pull over motorists. And the courts keep giving them more.

Sarah A. Seo

A Hated Expansion of Ottawa’s Chateau Laurier Will Go Ahead

The city council voted to approve an addition to the historic landmark over criticism that the design is “a travesty” and “frankly grotesque.”

Tracey Lindeman

Is It the End of the Line for a Notorious Louisiana Sheriff?

In Iberia Parish, a sheriff’s election is being closely watched since the incumbent, whose office has cost millions in abuse claims, has said he will not run.

Jessica Pishko


Roadside Attractions

(François Prost)

This spring, French photographer François Prost took an unconventional road trip across America: taking pictures of the exteriors of strip clubs from Miami to Los Angeles. The resulting series, “Gentlemen’s Club,” is a portrait of American culture and urbanism. The photos are striking in their placelessness, capturing utilitarian roadside attractions that lure in would-be clients with vibrant facades, flashy signs, and ample parking. More on CityLab: The Architecture of Adult Entertainment


What We’re Reading

Flint, Michigan, is becoming a destination for 2020 presidential candidates (Detroit Free Press)

Trump’s nationwide immigration raids fail to materialize (NPR)

This last-mile delivery startup wants to put robots in the bike lane (The Verge)

America’s addiction to absurdly fast shipping has an environmental cost (CNN)

Their family bought land one generation after slavery. The Reels brothers spent eight years in jail for refusing to leave it (ProPublica).


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