Also: How to see fall colors without a car, and the new MoMa is open for business.

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What We’re Following

Staying on target: Today’s high-priced cities face two overlapping crises that are often seen as the same thing. There’s gentrification, which mutates particular neighborhoods, and there’s a housing shortage, which is squeezing entire regions.

Both issues raise prices, strain families, and reallocate wealth to the already privileged. But it’s worth untangling how each is changing neighborhoods and cities, because the tactics for solving one crisis won’t solve the other, argues Devin Michelle Bunten, an urban planner and economist at MIT. While gentrification reshuffles who lives where in a city, the housing shortage is “like a region-wide round of musical chairs, in which the winners sat down before the music even stopped.” On CityLab: The Housing Shortage and Gentrification Aren’t the Same Thing

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How to See Fall Colors Without a Car

Americans often hit the road to see fall foliage, but it can be difficult to take the same trip without a car. These places make it a little easier.

Linda Poon

The New MoMA Is Bigger, More Diverse, and More Open to the City

The renovated and expanded Museum of Modern Art looks to connect the museum to New York City while telling a fuller story about modernism.

James S. Russell

A Police Department’s Difficult Assignment: Atonement

In Stockton, California, city and law enforcement leaders are attempting to build trust between police and communities of color. Why is this so hard to do?

Michael Friedrich

Why We Need to Dream Bigger Than Bike Lanes

In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

Terenig Topjian



What We’re Reading

2018 was the deadliest year for pedestrians and cyclists since 1990 (New York Times)

Exxon is on trial, accused of misleading investors about the risks of climate change (NPR)

Air pollution is getting worse and data shows more people are dying (Washington Post)

Letter of recommendation: mandatory blackouts (New York Times)

Maryland AG sues Kushner apartment company, alleging thousands of violations while renting rodent-infested units (Baltimore Sun)


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