Also: The battle between “walled gardens” and open mobility begins, and an activist architecture stirs in Chicago.

What We’re Following

Going global: This morning at the C40 Climate Summit in Copenhagen, Denmark, a group of 94 mayors around the world announced support for a Global Green New Deal. Together, those cities represent 700 million people (about 1 in 12 people worldwide) and one quarter of the global economy, according to the C40 website. The press conference at the World Mayors’ Summit also announced that Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will be the new chair of C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, replacing Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo, who has led the group for the past two years.

Both mayors have more good news to bring home: Their cities are among the more than 30 member cities in which emissions have “peaked,” per C40’s analysis ,and are now declining, along with cities like New York City, London, and Tokyo. CityLab’s Linda Poon has details on which cities have reached this milestone, and how much each city reduced its emissions. Read her story on what that means for tackling the global climate crisis: The Cities Where Emissions Are Dropping

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

‘Walled Gardens’ vs. Open Mobility: The Battle Begins

Why did Lyft block users of a third-party app from accessing New York’s Citi Bike? It’s the start of what could be a fundamental showdown over mobility choice.

David Zipper

An Activist Architecture Stirs in Chicago

Chicago Architecture Biennial participants are focused less on physical buildings than on laying the foundations of an overtly political approach to design.

Zach Mortice

I’m L.A.’s Map Librarian. But I Didn’t Love Maps.

And then I found Joseph Jacinto Mora, California’s king of pictorial mapmaking.

Glen Creason

Barred From Removing Their Confederate Monuments, Cities Try Adding Context

When state laws block the removal of statues, some cities are adding plaques and launching educational initiatives to put Civil War memorials in a new light

Emma Coleman


What We’re Reading

PG&E, the largest utility in California, could cut power to about 800,000 customers (San Francisco Chronicle)

What’s driving California’s emissions? You guessed it: Cars (Grist)

Uber will let pets ride in some cities—for a fee (The Verge)

The dream of New York’s forgotten elevated subway (Jalopnik)

What desert cities can teach us about water (JSTOR Daily)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a couple tries out a mattress in a store.
    Equity

    What’s the Future of the ‘Sleep Economy’?

    As bed-in-a-box startup Casper files for an IPO, the buzzy mattress seller is betting that the next big thing in sleep is brick-and-mortar retail outlets.

  2. Environment

    Neighborhoods With a History of Redlining Are Hotter on Average

    Housing discrimination during the 1930s helps explain why poorer neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

  3. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  4. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  5. World map showing the 400-plus large cities that sit in biodiversity hotspots
    Environment

    Mapping the 'Conflict Zones' Between Sprawl and Biodiversity

    If cities keep growing as they do now, nearly 400 of them will sprawl into the habitats of endangered species by 2030.

×